1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Our objective was to determine the association between sleep quality, symptom severity, and recovery following sport-related concussion in pediatric athletes. A review of data from the North Texas Concussion Network Prospective Registry (ConTex) was performed. Participants were diagnosed with a sport-related concussion and were ≤18 years old. Participants were categorized based on their initial clinic visit Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index composite score (0-21) into good sleep quality (GS≤5) and poor sleep quality (PS>5) groups. The PS group reported higher median total symptom scores at 3-month follow-up (3.0 vs 0.0, P <.01) and took more than a median of 2 weeks longer to recover compared to the GS group (35.0 days vs 20.0 days, P <.01). Poor sleep quality was strongly associated with greater symptom severity and longer time to recovery following sport-related concussion. Early recognition of concussed athletes with poor sleep quality at initial clinic visit may help predict prolonged recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of child neurology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Sports
Sleep
Pediatrics
Ambulatory Care
Athletes
Registries

Keywords

  • brain
  • concussion
  • outcome
  • pediatric
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

@article{a386ae2cd82643b4bb83874071ee47bb,
title = "Association Between Sleep Quality and Recovery Following Sport-Related Concussion in Pediatrics",
abstract = "Our objective was to determine the association between sleep quality, symptom severity, and recovery following sport-related concussion in pediatric athletes. A review of data from the North Texas Concussion Network Prospective Registry (ConTex) was performed. Participants were diagnosed with a sport-related concussion and were ≤18 years old. Participants were categorized based on their initial clinic visit Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index composite score (0-21) into good sleep quality (GS≤5) and poor sleep quality (PS>5) groups. The PS group reported higher median total symptom scores at 3-month follow-up (3.0 vs 0.0, P <.01) and took more than a median of 2 weeks longer to recover compared to the GS group (35.0 days vs 20.0 days, P <.01). Poor sleep quality was strongly associated with greater symptom severity and longer time to recovery following sport-related concussion. Early recognition of concussed athletes with poor sleep quality at initial clinic visit may help predict prolonged recovery.",
keywords = "brain, concussion, outcome, pediatric, sleep",
author = "Chung, {Jane S.} and Zynda, {Aaron J.} and Nyaz Didehbani and Cason Hicks and Hynan, {Linda S} and Miller, {Shane M.} and Bell, {Kathleen R} and Cullum, {C Munro}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0883073819849741",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Child Neurology",
issn = "0883-0738",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association Between Sleep Quality and Recovery Following Sport-Related Concussion in Pediatrics

AU - Chung, Jane S.

AU - Zynda, Aaron J.

AU - Didehbani, Nyaz

AU - Hicks, Cason

AU - Hynan, Linda S

AU - Miller, Shane M.

AU - Bell, Kathleen R

AU - Cullum, C Munro

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Our objective was to determine the association between sleep quality, symptom severity, and recovery following sport-related concussion in pediatric athletes. A review of data from the North Texas Concussion Network Prospective Registry (ConTex) was performed. Participants were diagnosed with a sport-related concussion and were ≤18 years old. Participants were categorized based on their initial clinic visit Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index composite score (0-21) into good sleep quality (GS≤5) and poor sleep quality (PS>5) groups. The PS group reported higher median total symptom scores at 3-month follow-up (3.0 vs 0.0, P <.01) and took more than a median of 2 weeks longer to recover compared to the GS group (35.0 days vs 20.0 days, P <.01). Poor sleep quality was strongly associated with greater symptom severity and longer time to recovery following sport-related concussion. Early recognition of concussed athletes with poor sleep quality at initial clinic visit may help predict prolonged recovery.

AB - Our objective was to determine the association between sleep quality, symptom severity, and recovery following sport-related concussion in pediatric athletes. A review of data from the North Texas Concussion Network Prospective Registry (ConTex) was performed. Participants were diagnosed with a sport-related concussion and were ≤18 years old. Participants were categorized based on their initial clinic visit Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index composite score (0-21) into good sleep quality (GS≤5) and poor sleep quality (PS>5) groups. The PS group reported higher median total symptom scores at 3-month follow-up (3.0 vs 0.0, P <.01) and took more than a median of 2 weeks longer to recover compared to the GS group (35.0 days vs 20.0 days, P <.01). Poor sleep quality was strongly associated with greater symptom severity and longer time to recovery following sport-related concussion. Early recognition of concussed athletes with poor sleep quality at initial clinic visit may help predict prolonged recovery.

KW - brain

KW - concussion

KW - outcome

KW - pediatric

KW - sleep

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066832496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85066832496&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0883073819849741

DO - 10.1177/0883073819849741

M3 - Article

C2 - 31113274

AN - SCOPUS:85066832496

JO - Journal of Child Neurology

JF - Journal of Child Neurology

SN - 0883-0738

ER -