Association of Concentric Left Ventricular Hypertrophy With Subsequent Change in Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Volume: The Dallas Heart Study

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the conventional paradigm of the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy, a thick-walled left ventricle (LV) ultimately transitions to a dilated cardiomyopathy. There are scant data in humans demonstrating whether this transition occurs commonly without an interval myocardial infarction.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Participants (n=1282) from the Dallas Heart Study underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance ≈7 years apart. Those with interval cardiovascular events and a dilated LV (increased LV end-diastolic volume [EDV] indexed to body surface area) at baseline were excluded. Multivariable linear regression models tested the association of concentric hypertrophy (increased LV mass and LV mass/volume0.67) with change in LVEDV. The study cohort had a median age of 44 years, 57% women, 43% black, and 11% (n=142) baseline concentric hypertrophy. The change in LVEDV in those with versus without concentric hypertrophy was 1 mL (-9 to 12) versus -2 mL (-11 to 7), respectively, P<0.01. In multivariable linear regression models, concentric hypertrophy was associated with larger follow-up LVEDV (P≤0.01). The progression to a dilated LV was uncommon (2%, n=25).

CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of interval myocardial infarction, concentric hypertrophy was associated with a small, but significantly greater, increase in LVEDV after 7-year follow-up. However, the degree of LV enlargement was minimal, and few participants developed a dilated LV. These data suggest that if concentric hypertrophy does progress to a dilated cardiomyopathy, such a transition would occur over a much longer timeframe (eg, decades) and perhaps less common than previously thought.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00344903.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCirculation. Heart failure
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Stroke Volume
Heart Ventricles
Hypertrophy
Linear Models
Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Myocardial Infarction
Body Surface Area
Cohort Studies
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • animals
  • dilation, left ventricular
  • heart
  • hypertrophy, left ventricular

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{aaebc8241efd458c821c910f71f33790,
title = "Association of Concentric Left Ventricular Hypertrophy With Subsequent Change in Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Volume: The Dallas Heart Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In the conventional paradigm of the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy, a thick-walled left ventricle (LV) ultimately transitions to a dilated cardiomyopathy. There are scant data in humans demonstrating whether this transition occurs commonly without an interval myocardial infarction.METHODS AND RESULTS: Participants (n=1282) from the Dallas Heart Study underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance ≈7 years apart. Those with interval cardiovascular events and a dilated LV (increased LV end-diastolic volume [EDV] indexed to body surface area) at baseline were excluded. Multivariable linear regression models tested the association of concentric hypertrophy (increased LV mass and LV mass/volume0.67) with change in LVEDV. The study cohort had a median age of 44 years, 57{\%} women, 43{\%} black, and 11{\%} (n=142) baseline concentric hypertrophy. The change in LVEDV in those with versus without concentric hypertrophy was 1 mL (-9 to 12) versus -2 mL (-11 to 7), respectively, P<0.01. In multivariable linear regression models, concentric hypertrophy was associated with larger follow-up LVEDV (P≤0.01). The progression to a dilated LV was uncommon (2{\%}, n=25).CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of interval myocardial infarction, concentric hypertrophy was associated with a small, but significantly greater, increase in LVEDV after 7-year follow-up. However, the degree of LV enlargement was minimal, and few participants developed a dilated LV. These data suggest that if concentric hypertrophy does progress to a dilated cardiomyopathy, such a transition would occur over a much longer timeframe (eg, decades) and perhaps less common than previously thought.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00344903.",
keywords = "animals, dilation, left ventricular, heart, hypertrophy, left ventricular",
author = "Sonia Garg and {de Lemos}, {James A} and Matulevicius, {Susan A} and Colby Ayers and Ambarish Pandey and Neeland, {Ian J} and Berry, {Jarett D} and McColl, {Roderick W} and Christopher Maroules and Peshock, {Ronald M} and Drazner, {Mark H}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.117.003959",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "Circulation. Heart failure",
issn = "1941-3297",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Concentric Left Ventricular Hypertrophy With Subsequent Change in Left Ventricular End-Diastolic Volume

T2 - The Dallas Heart Study

AU - Garg, Sonia

AU - de Lemos, James A

AU - Matulevicius, Susan A

AU - Ayers, Colby

AU - Pandey, Ambarish

AU - Neeland, Ian J

AU - Berry, Jarett D

AU - McColl, Roderick W

AU - Maroules, Christopher

AU - Peshock, Ronald M

AU - Drazner, Mark H

PY - 2017/8/1

Y1 - 2017/8/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: In the conventional paradigm of the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy, a thick-walled left ventricle (LV) ultimately transitions to a dilated cardiomyopathy. There are scant data in humans demonstrating whether this transition occurs commonly without an interval myocardial infarction.METHODS AND RESULTS: Participants (n=1282) from the Dallas Heart Study underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance ≈7 years apart. Those with interval cardiovascular events and a dilated LV (increased LV end-diastolic volume [EDV] indexed to body surface area) at baseline were excluded. Multivariable linear regression models tested the association of concentric hypertrophy (increased LV mass and LV mass/volume0.67) with change in LVEDV. The study cohort had a median age of 44 years, 57% women, 43% black, and 11% (n=142) baseline concentric hypertrophy. The change in LVEDV in those with versus without concentric hypertrophy was 1 mL (-9 to 12) versus -2 mL (-11 to 7), respectively, P<0.01. In multivariable linear regression models, concentric hypertrophy was associated with larger follow-up LVEDV (P≤0.01). The progression to a dilated LV was uncommon (2%, n=25).CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of interval myocardial infarction, concentric hypertrophy was associated with a small, but significantly greater, increase in LVEDV after 7-year follow-up. However, the degree of LV enlargement was minimal, and few participants developed a dilated LV. These data suggest that if concentric hypertrophy does progress to a dilated cardiomyopathy, such a transition would occur over a much longer timeframe (eg, decades) and perhaps less common than previously thought.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00344903.

AB - BACKGROUND: In the conventional paradigm of the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy, a thick-walled left ventricle (LV) ultimately transitions to a dilated cardiomyopathy. There are scant data in humans demonstrating whether this transition occurs commonly without an interval myocardial infarction.METHODS AND RESULTS: Participants (n=1282) from the Dallas Heart Study underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance ≈7 years apart. Those with interval cardiovascular events and a dilated LV (increased LV end-diastolic volume [EDV] indexed to body surface area) at baseline were excluded. Multivariable linear regression models tested the association of concentric hypertrophy (increased LV mass and LV mass/volume0.67) with change in LVEDV. The study cohort had a median age of 44 years, 57% women, 43% black, and 11% (n=142) baseline concentric hypertrophy. The change in LVEDV in those with versus without concentric hypertrophy was 1 mL (-9 to 12) versus -2 mL (-11 to 7), respectively, P<0.01. In multivariable linear regression models, concentric hypertrophy was associated with larger follow-up LVEDV (P≤0.01). The progression to a dilated LV was uncommon (2%, n=25).CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of interval myocardial infarction, concentric hypertrophy was associated with a small, but significantly greater, increase in LVEDV after 7-year follow-up. However, the degree of LV enlargement was minimal, and few participants developed a dilated LV. These data suggest that if concentric hypertrophy does progress to a dilated cardiomyopathy, such a transition would occur over a much longer timeframe (eg, decades) and perhaps less common than previously thought.CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00344903.

KW - animals

KW - dilation, left ventricular

KW - heart

KW - hypertrophy, left ventricular

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U2 - 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.117.003959

DO - 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.117.003959

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