Association of viral suppression with lower aids-defining and non–AIDS-defining cancer incidence in HIV-infected veterans: A prospective cohort study

Lesley S. Park, Janet P. Tate, Keith Sigel, Sheldon T. Brown, Kristina Crothers, Cynthia Gibert, Matthew Bidwell Goetz, David Rimland, Maria C. Rodriguez-Barradas, Roger J. Bedimo, Amy C. Justice, Robert Dubrow

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Abstract

Background: Viral suppression is a primary marker of HIV treatment success. Persons with HIV are at increased risk for AIDS-defining cancer (ADC) and several types of non–AIDS-defining cancer (NADC), some of which are caused by oncogenic viruses. Objective: To determine whether viral suppression is associated with decreased cancer risk. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: Department of Veterans Affairs. Participants: HIV-positive veterans (n = 42 441) and demographically matched uninfected veterans (n = 104 712) from 1999 to 2015. Measurements: Standardized cancer incidence rates and Poisson regression rate ratios (RRs; HIV-positive vs. uninfected persons) by viral suppression status (unsuppressed: person-time with HIV RNA levels ≥500 copies/mL; early suppression: initial 2 years with HIV RNA levels <500 copies/mL; long-term suppression: person-time after early suppression with HIV RNA levels <500 copies/mL). Results: Cancer incidence for HIV-positive versus uninfected persons was highest for unsuppressed persons (RR, 2.35 [95% CI, 2.19 to 2.51]), lower among persons with early suppression (RR, 1.99 [CI, 1.87 to 2.12]), and lowest among persons with long-term suppression (RR, 1.52 [CI, 1.44 to 1.61]). This trend was strongest for ADC (unsuppressed: RR, 22.73 [CI, 19.01 to 27.19]; early suppression: RR, 9.48 [CI, 7.78 to 11.55]; long-term suppression: RR, 2.22 [CI, 1.69 to 2.93]), much weaker for NADC caused by viruses (unsuppressed: RR, 3.82 [CI, 3.24 to 4.49]; early suppression: RR, 3.42 [CI, 2.95 to 3.97]; long-term suppression: RR, 3.17 [CI, 2.78 to 3.62]), and absent for NADC not caused by viruses. Limitation: Lower viral suppression thresholds, duration of long-term suppression, and effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts were not thoroughly evaluated. Conclusion: Antiretroviral therapy resulting in long-term viral suppression may contribute to cancer prevention, to a greater degree for ADC than for NADC. Patients with long-term viral suppression still had excess cancer risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-96
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Internal Medicine
Volume169
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 17 2018

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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Park, L. S., Tate, J. P., Sigel, K., Brown, S. T., Crothers, K., Gibert, C., Goetz, M. B., Rimland, D., Rodriguez-Barradas, M. C., Bedimo, R. J., Justice, A. C., & Dubrow, R. (2018). Association of viral suppression with lower aids-defining and non–AIDS-defining cancer incidence in HIV-infected veterans: A prospective cohort study. Annals of Internal Medicine, 169(2), 87-96. https://doi.org/10.7326/M16-2094