Autoantibodies against GPIHBP1 as a cause of hypertriglyceridemia

Anne P. Beigneux, Kazuya Miyashita, Michael Ploug, Dirk J. Blom, Masumi Ai, MacRae F. Linton, Weerapan Khovidhunkit, Robert Dufour, Abhimanyu Garg, Maureen A. McMahon, Clive R. Pullinger, Norma P. Sandoval, Xuchen Hu, Christopher M. Allan, Mikael Larsson, Tetsuo Machida, Masami Murakami, Karen Reue, Peter Tontonoz, Ira J. GoldbergPhilippe Moulin, Sybil Charrière, Loren G. Fong, Katsuyuki Nakajima, Stephen G. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: A protein that is expressed on capillary endothelial cells, called GPIHBP1 (glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1), binds lipoprotein lipase and shuttles it to its site of action in the capillary lumen. A deficiency in GPIHBP1 prevents lipoprotein lipase from reaching the capillary lumen. Patients with GPIHBP1 deficiency have low plasma levels of lipoprotein lipase, impaired intravascular hydrolysis of triglycerides, and severe hypertriglyceridemia (chylomicronemia). During the characterization of a monoclonal antibody-based immunoassay for GPIHBP1, we encountered two plasma samples (both from patients with chylomicronemia) that contained an interfering substance that made it impossible to measure GPIHBP1. That finding raised the possibility that those samples might contain GPIHBP1 autoantibodies. Methods: Using a combination of immunoassays, Western blot analyses, and immunocytochemical studies, we tested the two plasma samples (as well as samples from other patients with chylomicronemia) for the presence of GPIHBP1 autoantibodies. We also tested the ability of GPIHBP1 autoantibodies to block the binding of lipoprotein lipase to GPIHBP1. Results: We identified GPIHBP1 autoantibodies in six patients with chylomicronemia and found that these autoantibodies blocked the binding of lipoprotein lipase to GPIHBP1. As in patients with GPIHBP1 deficiency, those with GPIHBP1 autoantibodies had low plasma levels of lipoprotein lipase. Three of the six patients had systemic lupus erythematosus. One of these patients who had GPIHBP1 autoantibodies delivered a baby with plasma containing maternal GPIHBP1 autoantibodies; the infant had severe but transient chylomicronemia. Two of the patients with chylomicronemia and GPIHBP1 autoantibodies had a response to treatment with immunosuppressive agents. Conclusions: In six patients with chylomicronemia, GPIHBP1 autoantibodies blocked the ability of GPIHBP1 to bind and transport lipoprotein lipase, thereby interfering with lipoprotein lipase-mediated processing of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and causing severe hypertriglyceridemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1647-1658
Number of pages12
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume376
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Beigneux, A. P., Miyashita, K., Ploug, M., Blom, D. J., Ai, M., Linton, M. F., Khovidhunkit, W., Dufour, R., Garg, A., McMahon, M. A., Pullinger, C. R., Sandoval, N. P., Hu, X., Allan, C. M., Larsson, M., Machida, T., Murakami, M., Reue, K., Tontonoz, P., ... Young, S. G. (2017). Autoantibodies against GPIHBP1 as a cause of hypertriglyceridemia. New England Journal of Medicine, 376(17), 1647-1658. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1611930