Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Honglin Zhu, Hui Luo, Mei Yan, Xiaoxia Zuo, Quan Zhen Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-218
Number of pages9
JournalGenomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Autoantibodies
Autoantigens
Microarrays
Profiling
Microarray
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
High Throughput
Throughput
Proteins
Protein
Antigens
High-throughput Screening
Screening
Proteomics
Autoimmune Diseases
Specificity
Synovial Fluid
High-Throughput Screening Assays
Cerebrospinal fluid
Epitopes

Keywords

  • Autoantibody profiling
  • Biomarker
  • High-throughput assay
  • Proteomic microarray
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Computational Mathematics

Cite this

Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. / Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan Zhen.

In: Genomics, Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 210-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{202f9f7d262943d5b98538e0c04dd044,
title = "Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus",
abstract = "Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.",
keywords = "Autoantibody profiling, Biomarker, High-throughput assay, Proteomic microarray, Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)",
author = "Honglin Zhu and Hui Luo and Mei Yan and Xiaoxia Zuo and Li, {Quan Zhen}",
year = "2015",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.gpb.2015.09.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "210--218",
journal = "Genomics Proteomics Bioinformatics",
issn = "1672-0229",
publisher = "Beijing Genomics Institute",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

AU - Zhu, Honglin

AU - Luo, Hui

AU - Yan, Mei

AU - Zuo, Xiaoxia

AU - Li, Quan Zhen

PY - 2015/8/1

Y1 - 2015/8/1

N2 - Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

AB - Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

KW - Autoantibody profiling

KW - Biomarker

KW - High-throughput assay

KW - Proteomic microarray

KW - Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84944392826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84944392826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.gpb.2015.09.001

DO - 10.1016/j.gpb.2015.09.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 26415621

AN - SCOPUS:84944392826

VL - 13

SP - 210

EP - 218

JO - Genomics Proteomics Bioinformatics

JF - Genomics Proteomics Bioinformatics

SN - 1672-0229

IS - 4

ER -