Automated Detection of Vestibular Schwannoma Growth Using a Two-Dimensional U-Net Convolutional Neural Network

Nicholas A. George-Jones, Kai Wang, Jing Wang, Jacob B. Hunter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: To determine if an automated vestibular schwannoma (VS) segmentation model has comparable performance to using the greatest linear dimension to detect growth. Study Design: Case-control Study. Methods: Patients were selected from an internal database who had an initial gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan and a follow-up scan captured at least 5 months later. Two observers manually segmented the VS to compute volumes, and one observer's segmentations were used to train a convolutional neural network model to automatically segment the VS and determine the volume. The results of automatic segmentation were compared to the observer whose measurements were not used in model development to measure agreement. We then examined the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) to compare automated volumetric growth detection versus using the greatest linear dimension. Growth detection determined by the external observer's measurements served as the gold standard. Results: A total of 65 patients and 130 scans were studied. The automated method of segmentation demonstrated excellent agreement with the observer whose measurements were not used for model development for the initial scan (interclass correlational coefficient [ICC] = 0.995; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.991-0.997) and follow-up scan (ICC = 0.960; 95% CI: 0.935–0.975). The automated method of segmentation demonstrated increased sensitivity (72.2% vs. 63.9%), specificity (79.3% vs. 69.0%), and AUC (0.822 vs. 0.701) compared to using the greatest linear dimension for growth detection. Conclusions: In detecting VS growth, a convolutional neural network model outperformed using the greatest linear dimension, demonstrating a potential application of artificial intelligence methods to VS surveillance. Level of Evidence: 4 Laryngoscope, 2020.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLaryngoscope
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Acoustic neuroma
  • artificial intelligence
  • computer
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • neural networks
  • receiver operating characteristic curve

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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