Automatic speech and singing classification in ambulatory recordings for normal and disordered voices

Andrew J. Ortiz, Laura E. Toles, Katherine L. Marks, Silvia Capobianco, Daryush D. Mehta, Robert E. Hillman, Jarrad H. Van Stan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ambulatory voice monitoring is a promising tool for investigating phonotraumatic vocal hyperfunction (PVH), associated with the development of vocal fold lesions. Since many patients with PVH are professional vocalists, a classifier was developed to better understand phonatory mechanisms during speech and singing. Twenty singers with PVH and 20 matched healthy controls were monitored with a neck-surface accelerometer-based ambulatory voice monitor. An expert-labeled ground truth data set was used to train a logistic regression on 15 subject-pairs with fundamental frequency and autocorrelation peak amplitude as input features. Overall classification accuracy of 94.2% was achieved on the held-out test set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)EL22-EL27
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume146
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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