Autoregulatory CD8 T cells depend on cognate antigen recognition and CD4/CD8 myelin determinants

Sterling B. Ortega, Venkatesh P. Kashi, Khrishen Cunnusamy, Jorge Franco, Nitin J. Karandikar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the antigenic determinants and specific molecular requirements for the generation of autoregulatory neuroantigen-specific CD81 T cells in models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We have previously shown that MOG35-55-specific CD81 T cells suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the C57BL/6 model. In this study, we utilized multiple models of EAE to assess the ability to generate autoregulatory CD81 T cells. Results: We demonstrate that alternative myelin peptides (PLP178-191) and other susceptible mouse strains (SJL) generated myelin-specific CD81 T cells, which were fully capable of suppressing disease. The disease-ameliorating function of these cells was dependent on the specific cognate myelin antigen. Generation of these autoregulatory CD81 T cells was not affected by thymic selection, but was dependent on the presence of both CD41 and CD81 T-cell epitopes in the immunizing encephalitogenic antigen. Conclusions: These studies show that the generation of autoregulatory CD81 T cells is a more generalized, antigen-specific phenomenon across multiple neuroantigens and mouse strains, with significant implications in understanding disease regulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere170
JournalNeurology
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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CD4 Antigens
Myelin Sheath
T-Lymphocytes
Autoimmune Experimental Encephalomyelitis
Antigens
T-Lymphocyte Epitopes
Multiple Sclerosis
Epitopes
Peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Ortega, S. B., Kashi, V. P., Cunnusamy, K., Franco, J., & Karandikar, N. J. (2015). Autoregulatory CD8 T cells depend on cognate antigen recognition and CD4/CD8 myelin determinants. Neurology, 2(6), [e170]. https://doi.org/10.1212/NXI.0000000000000170

Autoregulatory CD8 T cells depend on cognate antigen recognition and CD4/CD8 myelin determinants. / Ortega, Sterling B.; Kashi, Venkatesh P.; Cunnusamy, Khrishen; Franco, Jorge; Karandikar, Nitin J.

In: Neurology, Vol. 2, No. 6, e170, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ortega, Sterling B. ; Kashi, Venkatesh P. ; Cunnusamy, Khrishen ; Franco, Jorge ; Karandikar, Nitin J. / Autoregulatory CD8 T cells depend on cognate antigen recognition and CD4/CD8 myelin determinants. In: Neurology. 2015 ; Vol. 2, No. 6.
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