Bacteremia and septic arthritis due to a nontoxigenic strain of Clostridium difficile in a patient with sickle cell disease

Emilie Hill, Adrienne D. Workman, Francesca Lee, Rita Hollaway, Dominick Cavuoti, Bonnie C. Prokesch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A 22-year-old female with sickle cell disease presented with fevers, bilateral knee pain, and lethargy. Laboratory data revealed a leukocytosis and lactic acidosis. Blood and synovial fluid cultures grew a non-toxin-producing strain of Clostridium difficile. This case highlights the fact that nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile can cause significant disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberofx278
JournalOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Infectious Arthritis
Clostridium difficile
Sickle Cell Anemia
Bacteremia
Lactic Acidosis
Lethargy
Synovial Fluid
Leukocytosis
Knee
Fever
Pain

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • Clostridium difficile
  • Hemoglobin SS disease
  • Septic arthritis
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Bacteremia and septic arthritis due to a nontoxigenic strain of Clostridium difficile in a patient with sickle cell disease. / Hill, Emilie; Workman, Adrienne D.; Lee, Francesca; Hollaway, Rita; Cavuoti, Dominick; Prokesch, Bonnie C.

In: Open Forum Infectious Diseases, Vol. 5, No. 2, ofx278, 01.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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