Bacterial chat

Intestinal metabolites and signals in host-microbiota-pathogen interactions

Bruna C. Lustri, Vanessa Sperandio, Cristiano G. Moreira

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal bacteria employ microbial metabolites from the microbiota and chemical signaling during cell-to-cell communication to regulate several cellular functions. Pathogenic bacteria are extremely efficient in orchestrating their response to these signals through complex signaling transduction systems. Precise coordination and interpretation of these multiple chemical cues is important within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Enteric foodborne pathogens, such as enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, or the surrogate murine infection model for EHEC, Citrobacter rodentium, are all examples of microorganisms that modulate the expression of their virulence repertoire in response to signals from the microbiota or the host, such as autoinducer-3 (AI-3), epinephrine (Epi), and norepinephrine (NE). The QseBC and QseEF two-component systems, shared by these pathogens, are involved in sensing these signals. We review how these signaling systems sense and relay these signals to drive bacterial gene expression; specifically, to modulate virulence. We also review how bacteria chat via chemical signals integrated with metabolite recognition and utilization to promote successful associations among enteric pathogens, the microbiota, and the host.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00476-17
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume85
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Host-Pathogen Interactions
Microbiota
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
Bacteria
Virulence
Citrobacter rodentium
Bacterial Genes
Salmonella enterica
Cell Communication
Epinephrine
Cues
Gastrointestinal Tract
Norepinephrine
Gene Expression
Infection

Keywords

  • Chemical signaling
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • Escherichia
  • Intestinal metabolites
  • Salmonella

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Bacterial chat : Intestinal metabolites and signals in host-microbiota-pathogen interactions. / Lustri, Bruna C.; Sperandio, Vanessa; Moreira, Cristiano G.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 85, No. 12, e00476-17, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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