Bacterial meningitis complicating cranial spinal trauma

S. R. Jones, J. P. Luby, J. P. Sanford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The microorganisms isolated from 22 patients with meningitis occurring after cranial or spinal trauma are correlated with the clinical patterns. Diplococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent isolate. All 5 of these patients had their onset within 3 days of trauma, which in each case was a nonpenetrating head injury. In those patients with more severe injuries or increasing length of time between the trauma and the onset of meningitis, the microorganisms were diverse, including Staphylococcus aureus and gram negative bacilli. When the clinical situation indicates that these organisms may be responsible for the meningitis, broad empiric antibiotic coverage should be used initially and until bacteriologic studies indicate the desirability of its alteration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)895-900
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume13
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1973

Fingerprint

Bacterial Meningitides
Meningitis
Wounds and Injuries
Closed Head Injuries
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Bacillus
Staphylococcus aureus
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Jones, S. R., Luby, J. P., & Sanford, J. P. (1973). Bacterial meningitis complicating cranial spinal trauma. Journal of Trauma, 13(10), 895-900.

Bacterial meningitis complicating cranial spinal trauma. / Jones, S. R.; Luby, J. P.; Sanford, J. P.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 13, No. 10, 1973, p. 895-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, SR, Luby, JP & Sanford, JP 1973, 'Bacterial meningitis complicating cranial spinal trauma', Journal of Trauma, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 895-900.
Jones, S. R. ; Luby, J. P. ; Sanford, J. P. / Bacterial meningitis complicating cranial spinal trauma. In: Journal of Trauma. 1973 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 895-900.
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