Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress

Zachary J. Schlader, Daniel Gagnon, Rebekah A I Lucas, James Pearson, Craig G. Crandall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm-2·min-1) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm-2·min-1, P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm-2·min-1; P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-454
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pressoreceptors
Sweat
Forearm
Hot Temperature
Phenylephrine
Arterial Pressure
Central Venous Pressure
Heating
Blood Vessels
Healthy Volunteers
Fever
Skin
Temperature

Keywords

  • Arterial baroreceptors
  • Cardiopulmonary baroreceptors
  • Central venous pressure
  • Hyperthermia
  • Skin blood flow
  • Sweat rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress. / Schlader, Zachary J.; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 118, No. 4, 01.02.2015, p. 449-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schlader, Zachary J. ; Gagnon, Daniel ; Lucas, Rebekah A I ; Pearson, James ; Crandall, Craig G. / Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2015 ; Vol. 118, No. 4. pp. 449-454.
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abstract = "This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm-2·min-1) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm-2·min-1, P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20{\%} of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm-2·min-1; P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.",
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AB - This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm-2·min-1) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm-2·min-1, P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm-2·min-1; P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

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