Barriers to End-of-Life Care for African Americans From the Providers’ Perspective

Opportunity for Intervention Development

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has shown that African Americans (AAs) are less likely to complete advance directives and enroll in hospice. We examined barriers to use of these end-of-life (EOL) care options by conducting semi-structured interviews with hospice and palliative medicine providers and leaders of a national health care organization. Barriers identified included: lack of knowledge about prognosis, desires for aggressive treatment, family members resistance to accepting hospice, and lack of insurance. Providers believed that acceptance of EOL care options among AAs could be improved by increasing cultural sensitivity though education and training initiatives, and increasing staff diversity. Respondents did not have programs currently in place to increase awareness of EOL care options for underrepresented minorities, but felt that there was a need to develop these types of programs. These data can be used in future research endeavors to create interventions designed to increase awareness of EOL care options for AAs and other underrepresented minorities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-143
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 2015

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Terminal Care
African Americans
Hospices
Advance Directives
Insurance
Organizations
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • barriers
  • disparities
  • hospice and palliative care
  • interventions
  • underutilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Research has shown that African Americans (AAs) are less likely to complete advance directives and enroll in hospice. We examined barriers to use of these end-of-life (EOL) care options by conducting semi-structured interviews with hospice and palliative medicine providers and leaders of a national health care organization. Barriers identified included: lack of knowledge about prognosis, desires for aggressive treatment, family members resistance to accepting hospice, and lack of insurance. Providers believed that acceptance of EOL care options among AAs could be improved by increasing cultural sensitivity though education and training initiatives, and increasing staff diversity. Respondents did not have programs currently in place to increase awareness of EOL care options for underrepresented minorities, but felt that there was a need to develop these types of programs. These data can be used in future research endeavors to create interventions designed to increase awareness of EOL care options for AAs and other underrepresented minorities.",
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