Behavioral Self-Regulation in Adolescents With Type I Diabetes

Negative Affectivity and Blood Glucose Symptom Perception

Deborah J. Wiebe, Melissa A. Alderfer, Steven C. Palmer, Rob Lindsay, Lucie Jarrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that negative affectivity (NA) is associated with accuracy of blood glucose (BG) symptom perceptions and diabetes control was assessed. After completing measures of BG symptom beliefs and NA-related constructs (i.e., attentional focus and trait anxiety), 35 adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes monitored their physical symptoms and their actual BG levels 3 times daily for 2 weeks. Each subject's actual BG symptoms were determined by correlating symptom ratings with BG levels and were then compared with symptom beliefs. Those who were more internally focused were more able to discern which symptoms actually covaried with BG fluctuations; those with higher trait anxiety tended to misattribute non-diabetes-related symptoms to BG levels. Finally, interactions suggested that those who both attend to internal physical sensations and experience-heightened anxiety display poorer metabolic control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1204-1212
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume62
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1994

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Anxiety
Self-Control
Insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Behavioral Self-Regulation in Adolescents With Type I Diabetes : Negative Affectivity and Blood Glucose Symptom Perception. / Wiebe, Deborah J.; Alderfer, Melissa A.; Palmer, Steven C.; Lindsay, Rob; Jarrett, Lucie.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 62, No. 6, 12.1994, p. 1204-1212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiebe, Deborah J. ; Alderfer, Melissa A. ; Palmer, Steven C. ; Lindsay, Rob ; Jarrett, Lucie. / Behavioral Self-Regulation in Adolescents With Type I Diabetes : Negative Affectivity and Blood Glucose Symptom Perception. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1994 ; Vol. 62, No. 6. pp. 1204-1212.
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