Benzodiazepines in the treatment of alcoholism.

D. Nutt, B. Adinoff, M. Linnoila

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41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter comprises three sections that cover the main aspects of benzodiazepines and alcohol: (1) the basic pharmacology of benzodiazepines; (2) use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of withdrawal; and (3) the use of benzodiazepines in treating alcoholics. The basic studies suggest that a major site of action of alcohol may be the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex and that compensatory alterations in this complex may underly withdrawal. In the section on alcohol withdrawal, interactions between the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex, sympathetic nervous system, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are discussed. Use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome are reviewed, including the possibility that the benzodiazepines may prevent withdrawal-induced "kindling." Lastly, we review indications for, and efficacy of, benzodiazepines in long-term treatment of patients with alcoholism. Benzodiazepines are not indicated for the treatment of alcoholism. Furthermore, they have very few indications in alcoholics and their dependency-producing potency has to be appreciated when they are used in patients with alcoholism.

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Benzodiazepines
Alcoholism
Alcohols
GABA-A Receptors
Therapeutics
Alcoholics
Sympathetic Nervous System
Pharmacology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Benzodiazepines in the treatment of alcoholism.",
abstract = "This chapter comprises three sections that cover the main aspects of benzodiazepines and alcohol: (1) the basic pharmacology of benzodiazepines; (2) use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of withdrawal; and (3) the use of benzodiazepines in treating alcoholics. The basic studies suggest that a major site of action of alcohol may be the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex and that compensatory alterations in this complex may underly withdrawal. In the section on alcohol withdrawal, interactions between the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex, sympathetic nervous system, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are discussed. Use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome are reviewed, including the possibility that the benzodiazepines may prevent withdrawal-induced {"}kindling.{"} Lastly, we review indications for, and efficacy of, benzodiazepines in long-term treatment of patients with alcoholism. Benzodiazepines are not indicated for the treatment of alcoholism. Furthermore, they have very few indications in alcoholics and their dependency-producing potency has to be appreciated when they are used in patients with alcoholism.",
author = "D. Nutt and B. Adinoff and M. Linnoila",
year = "1989",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "283--313",
journal = "Recent developments in alcoholism : an official publication of the American Medical Society on Alcoholism, the Research Society on Alcoholism, and the National Council on Alcoholism",
issn = "0738-422X",
publisher = "Plenum Press",

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AU - Nutt, D.

AU - Adinoff, B.

AU - Linnoila, M.

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N2 - This chapter comprises three sections that cover the main aspects of benzodiazepines and alcohol: (1) the basic pharmacology of benzodiazepines; (2) use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of withdrawal; and (3) the use of benzodiazepines in treating alcoholics. The basic studies suggest that a major site of action of alcohol may be the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex and that compensatory alterations in this complex may underly withdrawal. In the section on alcohol withdrawal, interactions between the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex, sympathetic nervous system, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis are discussed. Use of benzodiazepines in the treatment of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome are reviewed, including the possibility that the benzodiazepines may prevent withdrawal-induced "kindling." Lastly, we review indications for, and efficacy of, benzodiazepines in long-term treatment of patients with alcoholism. Benzodiazepines are not indicated for the treatment of alcoholism. Furthermore, they have very few indications in alcoholics and their dependency-producing potency has to be appreciated when they are used in patients with alcoholism.

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