Big data in health care: Using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients

David W. Bates, Suchi Saria, Lucila Ohno-Machado, Anand Shah, Gabriel Escobar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

337 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The US health care system is rapidly adopting electronic health records, which will dramatically increase the quantity of clinical data that are available electronically. Simultaneously, rapid progress has been made in clinical analytics-techniques for analyzing large quantities of data and gleaning new insights from that analysis-which is part of what is known as big data. As a result, there are unprecedented opportunities to use big data to reduce the costs of health care in the United States. We present six use cases-that is, key examples-where some of the clearest opportunities exist to reduce costs through the use of big data: high-cost patients, readmissions, triage, decompensation (when a patient's condition worsens), adverse events, and treatment optimization for diseases affecting multiple organ systems. We discuss the types of insights that are likely to emerge from clinical analytics, the types of data needed to obtain such insights, and the infrastructure-analytics, algorithms, registries, assessment scores, monitoring devices, and so forth-that organizations will need to perform the necessary analyses and to implement changes that will improve care while reducing costs. Our findings have policy implications for regulatory oversight, ways to address privacy concerns, and the support of research on analytics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1123-1131
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume33
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Patient Readmission
Electronic Health Records
Privacy
Triage
Health Care Costs
Registries
Organizations
Equipment and Supplies
Research
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Big data in health care : Using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients. / Bates, David W.; Saria, Suchi; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Shah, Anand; Escobar, Gabriel.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 33, No. 7, 2014, p. 1123-1131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bates, DW, Saria, S, Ohno-Machado, L, Shah, A & Escobar, G 2014, 'Big data in health care: Using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients', Health Affairs, vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 1123-1131. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2014.0041
Bates, David W. ; Saria, Suchi ; Ohno-Machado, Lucila ; Shah, Anand ; Escobar, Gabriel. / Big data in health care : Using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients. In: Health Affairs. 2014 ; Vol. 33, No. 7. pp. 1123-1131.
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