Bioresorbable microporous stents deliver recombinant adenovirus gene transfer vectors to the arterial wall

Yun Wei Ye, Charles Landau, John E. Willard, Ganesh Rajasubramanian, Ari Moskowitz, Sheza Aziz, Robert S. Meidell, Robert C. Eberhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of intravascular stents as an adjunct for percutaneous transluminal revascularization is limited by two principal factors, acute thrombosis and neointimal proliferation, resulting in restenosis. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated the potential of microporous bioresorbable polymer stents formed from poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blends to function both to provide mechanical support and as reservoirs for local delivery of therapeutic molecules and particles to the vessel wall. Tubular PLLA/PCL stents were fabricated by the flotation-precipitation method, and helical stents were produced by a casting/winding technique. Hybrid structures in which a tubular sheath is deposited on a helical skeleton were also generated. Using a two-stage solvent swelling technique, polyethylene oxide has been incorporated into these stents to improve hydrophilicity and water uptake, and to facilitate the ability of these devices to function as drug carriers. Stents modified in this manner retain axial and radial mechanical strength sufficient to stabilize the vessel wall against elastic recoil caused by vasoconstrictive and mechanical forces. Because of the potential of direct gene transfer into the vessel wall to ameliorate thrombosis and neointimal proliferation, we have investigated the capacity of these polymer stents to function in the delivery of recombinant adenovirus vectors to the vessel wall. In vitro, virus stock was observed to readily absorb into, and elute from these devices in an infectious form, with suitable kinetics. Successful gene transfer and expression has been demonstrated following implantation of polymer stents impregnated with a recombinant adenovirus carrying a nuclear-localizing βGal reporter gene into rabbit carotid arteries. These studies suggest that surface-modified polymer stents may ultimately be useful adjunctive devices for both mechanical support and gene transfer during percutaneous transluminal revascularization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)398-408
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Angioplasty
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Gene therapy
  • Vascular stent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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    Ye, Y. W., Landau, C., Willard, J. E., Rajasubramanian, G., Moskowitz, A., Aziz, S., Meidell, R. S., & Eberhart, R. C. (1998). Bioresorbable microporous stents deliver recombinant adenovirus gene transfer vectors to the arterial wall. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 26(3), 398-408. https://doi.org/10.1114/1.62