Bladder entrapment after external fixation of traumatic pubic diastasis: Importance of follow-up computed tomography in establishing prompt diagnosis

James J. Geracci, Allen F. Morey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

A 30-year-old male was an unrestrained driver in a high-speed motor vehicle crash. On presentation, the patient was profoundly hypotensive with multiple injuries, including a 20-cm-deep perineal laceration with avulsion of the rectum, a diffusely tender abdomen, an unstable open-book pelvic fracture, and multiple rib fractures. Blood noted at the urethral meatus prompted a retrograde urethrogram and cystogram, which were within normal limits. A Foley catheter was placed with the return of clear urine. Closed reduction and external fixation of the pelvic fracture were performed emergently without difficulty. Postoperative computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a retrovesical pelvic hematoma and entrapment of the bladder in the reduced pubic symphysis diastasis. Lower abdominal exploration revealed an intact bladder without evidence of gross bladder wall injury. On release of the external fixator, the bladder was easily reduced into the normal retropubic location. Definitive internal fixation of the pubic diastasis was performed. No urologic sequelae were noted postoperatively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)492-493
Number of pages2
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume165
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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