Blood component support in acquired coagulopathic conditions: Is there a method to the madness?

Trailokya Nath Pandit, Ravindra Sarode

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acquired coagulopathies are often detected by laboratory investigation in clinical practice. There is a poor correlation between mild to moderate abnormalities of laboratory test and bleeding tendency. Patients who are bleeding due to coagulopathy are often managed with various blood components including plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate. However, prophylactic transfusion of these products in a nonbleeding patient to correct mild to moderate abnormality of a coagulation test especially preprocedure is not evidence-based. This article reviews the management of bleeding due to oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, disseminated intravascular coagulation, chronic liver disease, and trauma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Hematology
Volume87
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Hemorrhage
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Anticoagulants
Liver Diseases
Chronic Disease
Blood Platelets
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Blood component support in acquired coagulopathic conditions : Is there a method to the madness? / Pandit, Trailokya Nath; Sarode, Ravindra.

In: American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 87, No. SUPPL. 1, 05.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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