Body Weight Changes with β-Blocker Use: Results from GEMINI

Franz H. Messerli, David S H Bell, Vivian Fonseca, Richard E. Katholi, Janet B. McGill, Robert A. Phillips, Philip Raskin, Jackson T. Wright, Sripal Bangalore, Fred K. Holdbrook, Mary Ann Lukas, Karen M. Anderson, George L. Bakris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Patients with type 2 diabetes are commonly overweight, which can contribute to poor cardiovascular outcomes. β-blockers may promote weight gain, or hamper weight loss, and are a concern in high-risk patients. The current analysis of the Glycemic Effect in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial evaluates the effects of carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate on weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Methods: This prespecified secondary analysis of the GEMINI study (n=1106) evaluated change in body weight after 5 months. Results: Mean (±SE) baseline weights were 97.5 (±20.1) kg for carvedilol and 96.6 (±20.1) kg for metoprolol tartrate. Treatment difference (c vs m) in mean (±SE) weight change from baseline was -1.02 (±0.21) kg (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.43 to -0.60; P <.001). Patients taking metoprolol had a significant mean (±SE) weight gain of 1.19 (±0.16) kg (P <.001); patients taking carvedilol did not (0.17 [±0.19] kg; P =.36). Metoprolol tartrate-treated patients with body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 had a statistically significant greater weight gain than comparable carvedilol-treated patients. Treatment differences (c vs m) in the obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) and morbidly obese groups (BMI >40 kg/m2) were -0.90 kg (95% CI, -1.5 to -0.3; P =.002) and -1.84 kg (95% CI, -2.9 to -0.8; P =.001), respectively. Pairwise correlation analyses revealed no significant associations between weight change and change in HbA1c, HOMA-IR, or blood pressure. Conclusions: Metoprolol tartrate was associated with increased weight gain compared to carvedilol; weight gain was most pronounced in subjects with hypertension and diabetes who were not taking insulin therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)610-615
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume120
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Body Weight Changes
Metoprolol
Weight Gain
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hypertension
Weight Loss
Diabetes Mellitus
Therapeutics
carvedilol
Insulin
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • β-blockers
  • Body Mass Index (BMI)
  • Carvedilol
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Metoprolol
  • Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Messerli, F. H., Bell, D. S. H., Fonseca, V., Katholi, R. E., McGill, J. B., Phillips, R. A., ... Bakris, G. L. (2007). Body Weight Changes with β-Blocker Use: Results from GEMINI. American Journal of Medicine, 120(7), 610-615. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.10.017

Body Weight Changes with β-Blocker Use : Results from GEMINI. / Messerli, Franz H.; Bell, David S H; Fonseca, Vivian; Katholi, Richard E.; McGill, Janet B.; Phillips, Robert A.; Raskin, Philip; Wright, Jackson T.; Bangalore, Sripal; Holdbrook, Fred K.; Lukas, Mary Ann; Anderson, Karen M.; Bakris, George L.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 120, No. 7, 07.2007, p. 610-615.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Messerli, FH, Bell, DSH, Fonseca, V, Katholi, RE, McGill, JB, Phillips, RA, Raskin, P, Wright, JT, Bangalore, S, Holdbrook, FK, Lukas, MA, Anderson, KM & Bakris, GL 2007, 'Body Weight Changes with β-Blocker Use: Results from GEMINI', American Journal of Medicine, vol. 120, no. 7, pp. 610-615. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.10.017
Messerli FH, Bell DSH, Fonseca V, Katholi RE, McGill JB, Phillips RA et al. Body Weight Changes with β-Blocker Use: Results from GEMINI. American Journal of Medicine. 2007 Jul;120(7):610-615. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2006.10.017
Messerli, Franz H. ; Bell, David S H ; Fonseca, Vivian ; Katholi, Richard E. ; McGill, Janet B. ; Phillips, Robert A. ; Raskin, Philip ; Wright, Jackson T. ; Bangalore, Sripal ; Holdbrook, Fred K. ; Lukas, Mary Ann ; Anderson, Karen M. ; Bakris, George L. / Body Weight Changes with β-Blocker Use : Results from GEMINI. In: American Journal of Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 120, No. 7. pp. 610-615.
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abstract = "Purpose: Patients with type 2 diabetes are commonly overweight, which can contribute to poor cardiovascular outcomes. β-blockers may promote weight gain, or hamper weight loss, and are a concern in high-risk patients. The current analysis of the Glycemic Effect in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial evaluates the effects of carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate on weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Methods: This prespecified secondary analysis of the GEMINI study (n=1106) evaluated change in body weight after 5 months. Results: Mean (±SE) baseline weights were 97.5 (±20.1) kg for carvedilol and 96.6 (±20.1) kg for metoprolol tartrate. Treatment difference (c vs m) in mean (±SE) weight change from baseline was -1.02 (±0.21) kg (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], -1.43 to -0.60; P <.001). Patients taking metoprolol had a significant mean (±SE) weight gain of 1.19 (±0.16) kg (P <.001); patients taking carvedilol did not (0.17 [±0.19] kg; P =.36). Metoprolol tartrate-treated patients with body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 had a statistically significant greater weight gain than comparable carvedilol-treated patients. Treatment differences (c vs m) in the obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) and morbidly obese groups (BMI >40 kg/m2) were -0.90 kg (95{\%} CI, -1.5 to -0.3; P =.002) and -1.84 kg (95{\%} CI, -2.9 to -0.8; P =.001), respectively. Pairwise correlation analyses revealed no significant associations between weight change and change in HbA1c, HOMA-IR, or blood pressure. Conclusions: Metoprolol tartrate was associated with increased weight gain compared to carvedilol; weight gain was most pronounced in subjects with hypertension and diabetes who were not taking insulin therapy.",
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AU - Messerli, Franz H.

AU - Bell, David S H

AU - Fonseca, Vivian

AU - Katholi, Richard E.

AU - McGill, Janet B.

AU - Phillips, Robert A.

AU - Raskin, Philip

AU - Wright, Jackson T.

AU - Bangalore, Sripal

AU - Holdbrook, Fred K.

AU - Lukas, Mary Ann

AU - Anderson, Karen M.

AU - Bakris, George L.

PY - 2007/7

Y1 - 2007/7

N2 - Purpose: Patients with type 2 diabetes are commonly overweight, which can contribute to poor cardiovascular outcomes. β-blockers may promote weight gain, or hamper weight loss, and are a concern in high-risk patients. The current analysis of the Glycemic Effect in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial evaluates the effects of carvedilol and metoprolol tartrate on weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Methods: This prespecified secondary analysis of the GEMINI study (n=1106) evaluated change in body weight after 5 months. Results: Mean (±SE) baseline weights were 97.5 (±20.1) kg for carvedilol and 96.6 (±20.1) kg for metoprolol tartrate. Treatment difference (c vs m) in mean (±SE) weight change from baseline was -1.02 (±0.21) kg (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.43 to -0.60; P <.001). Patients taking metoprolol had a significant mean (±SE) weight gain of 1.19 (±0.16) kg (P <.001); patients taking carvedilol did not (0.17 [±0.19] kg; P =.36). Metoprolol tartrate-treated patients with body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 had a statistically significant greater weight gain than comparable carvedilol-treated patients. Treatment differences (c vs m) in the obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) and morbidly obese groups (BMI >40 kg/m2) were -0.90 kg (95% CI, -1.5 to -0.3; P =.002) and -1.84 kg (95% CI, -2.9 to -0.8; P =.001), respectively. Pairwise correlation analyses revealed no significant associations between weight change and change in HbA1c, HOMA-IR, or blood pressure. Conclusions: Metoprolol tartrate was associated with increased weight gain compared to carvedilol; weight gain was most pronounced in subjects with hypertension and diabetes who were not taking insulin therapy.

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KW - β-blockers

KW - Body Mass Index (BMI)

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KW - Diabetes

KW - Hypertension

KW - Metoprolol

KW - Weight

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