Bordetella holmesii bacteremia in sickle cell disease

Timothy L. McCavit, Steve Grube, Paula Revell, Charles T. Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have an increased risk of invasive bacterial infection because of hyposplenism. Bordetella holmesii is a recently described Gram-negative coccobacillus with an apparent predilection for asplenic hosts. We report two patients with SCD and B. holmesii bacteremia. Fastidious growth in culture and a typically uncomplicated clinical course distinguish B. holmesii infection from other invasive bacterial infections in SCD. Providers for patients with SCD should be aware of this pathogen and ensure that their microbiology laboratories are capable of isolating and identifying this organism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)814-816
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

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Bordetella
Sickle Cell Anemia
Bacteremia
Bacterial Infections
Microbiology
Growth
Infection

Keywords

  • Asplenia
  • Bacteremia
  • Bordetella holmesii
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology

Cite this

Bordetella holmesii bacteremia in sickle cell disease. / McCavit, Timothy L.; Grube, Steve; Revell, Paula; Quinn, Charles T.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 51, No. 6, 12.2008, p. 814-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCavit, Timothy L. ; Grube, Steve ; Revell, Paula ; Quinn, Charles T. / Bordetella holmesii bacteremia in sickle cell disease. In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer. 2008 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 814-816.
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