Brain activation while thinking about the self from another person's perspective after traumatic brain injury in adolescents

Mary R. Newsome, Randall S. Scheibel, Gerri Hanten, Z. Chu, Joel L. Steinberg, Jill V. Hunter, Hanzhang Lu, Ana C. Vasquez, Xiaoqi Li, Xiaodi Lin, Lori Cook, Harvey S. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Deficits in self awareness and taking the perspective of others are often observed following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Nine adolescents (ages 12-19 years) who had sustained moderate to severe TBI after an average interval of 2.6 years and nine typically developing (TD) adolescents underwent functional MRI (fMRI) while performing a perspective taking task (D'Argembeau et al., 2007). Participants made trait attributions either from their own perspective or from that of the significant other. The groups did not differ in reaction time or on a consistency criterion. When thinking of the self from a third-person perspective, adolescents with TBI demonstrated greater activation in posterior brain regions implicated in social cognition, the left lingual gyrus (BA 18) and posterior cingulate (BA 31), extending into neighboring regions not generally associated with social cognition, that is, cuneus (BA 31) and parahippocampal gyrus, relative to TD adolescents. We postulate that adolescents with moderate to severe TBI recruited alternative neural pathways during perspective-taking because traumatic axonal injury disrupted their fronto-parietal networks mediating social cognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-147
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • FMRI
  • Social cognition
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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    Newsome, M. R., Scheibel, R. S., Hanten, G., Chu, Z., Steinberg, J. L., Hunter, J. V., Lu, H., Vasquez, A. C., Li, X., Lin, X., Cook, L., & Levin, H. S. (2010). Brain activation while thinking about the self from another person's perspective after traumatic brain injury in adolescents. Neuropsychology, 24(2), 139-147. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0017432