Brain White Matter Hyperintensity Lesion Characterization in T2 Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Magnetic Resonance Images: Shape, Texture, and Potential Growth

Chih Ying Gwo, David C. Zhu, Rong Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prior methods in characterizing age-related white matter hyperintensity (WMH) lesions on T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance images (MRI) have mainly been limited to understanding the sizes of, and occasionally the locations of WMH lesions. Systematic morphological characterization has been missing. In this work, we proposed innovative methods to fill this knowledge gap. We developed an innovative and proof-of-concept method to characterize and quantify the shape (based on Zernike transformation) and texture (based on fuzzy logic) of WMH lesions. We have also developed a multi-dimension feature vector approach to cluster WMH lesions into distinctive groups based on their shape and then texture features. We then developed an approach to calculate the potential growth index (PGI) of WMH lesions based on the image intensity distributions at the edge of the WMH lesions using a region-growing algorithm. High-quality T2 FLAIR images containing clearly identifiable WMH lesions with various sizes from six cognitively normal older adults were used in our method development Analyses of Variance (ANOVAs) showed significant differences in PGI among WMH group clusters in terms of either the shape (P = 1.06 × 10−2) or the texture (P < 1 × 10−20) features. In conclusion, we propose a systematic framework on which the shape and texture features of WMH lesions can be quantified and may be used to predict lesion growth in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number353
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 16 2019

Keywords

  • brain T FLAIR hyperintensity
  • morphology
  • potential growth
  • shape
  • texture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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