Breast cancer metastasis to a mandibular extraction socket: A case report and discussion on clinical detection of metastasis to the oral cavity

Helaman Paul Erickson, Aya Hamao-Sakamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oral cavity metastases are rare, representing approximately 1% of all oral malignancies [1], and are difficult to diagnose because of their rarity and their atypical clinical and radiographic appearance. It is important to determine the diagnosis of an unhealed extraction socket. There are many considerations, especially in a patient with a prior diagnosis of cancer. A patient who has previously been diagnosed with a bone metastasis is at risk for osteonecrosis, osteomyelitis, or bony metastasis. Furthermore, both bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw and osteoradionecrosis need to be considered in the differential diagnosis for a patient taking a bisphosphonate for cancer or osteoporosis, or who has previously received radiation therapy.Herein, we present a case of metastasis to an extraction socket in the mandible that lead to a definitive diagnosis of breast cancer metastasis. We also discuss the clinical detection of oral metastasis, the prognosis of which is very poor and therefore needs to be identified at an early stage. The oral cavity is an easily accessible region, which can be directly evaluated, prompting further investigation for a metastatic lesion if required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-267
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Mandible
  • Metastasis
  • Numb chin syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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