Breast Cancer Screening With Imaging: Recommendations From the Society of Breast Imaging and the ACR on the Use of Mammography, Breast MRI, Breast Ultrasound, and Other Technologies for the Detection of Clinically Occult Breast Cancer

Carol H. Lee, D. David Dershaw, Daniel Kopans, Phil Evans, Barbara Monsees, Debra Monticciolo, R. James Brenner, Lawrence Bassett, Wendie Berg, Stephen Feig, Edward Hendrick, Ellen Mendelson, Carl D'Orsi, Edward Sickles, Linda Warren Burhenne

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

500 Scopus citations

Abstract

Screening for breast cancer with mammography has been shown to decrease mortality from breast cancer, and mammography is the mainstay of screening for clinically occult disease. Mammography, however, has well-recognized limitations, and recently, other imaging including ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have been used as adjunctive screening tools, mainly for women who may be at increased risk for the development of breast cancer. The Society of Breast Imaging and the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR are issuing these recommendations to provide guidance to patients and clinicians on the use of imaging to screen for breast cancer. Wherever possible, the recommendations are based on available evidence. Where evidence is lacking, the recommendations are based on consensus opinions of the fellows and executive committee of the Society of Breast Imaging and the members of the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-27
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Screening
  • breast MRI
  • breast cancer
  • breast ultrasound
  • mammography
  • recommendations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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