Brief report

Physicians and their personal prostate cancer-screening practices with prostate-specific antigen - A national survey

Evelyn C Y Chan, Michael J. Barry, Sally W. Vernon, Chul Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is inconclusive evidence that prostate cancer screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) reduces mortality. Although PSA testing is widespread, it is unknown how many physicians have taken the PSA test themselves. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of PSA testing among physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SUBJECTS: A nationwide stratified random sample of urologists (response rate 61%, n=247), Internists (response rate 51%, n=273), and family physicians (response rate 64%, n=249) were surveyed by mail in 2000. After excluding female respondents and men who either reported a positive history of prostate cancer or did not respond to that query, there were 146 urologists, 96 Internists, and 118 family physicians. MEASUREMENTS: Whether physicians had undergone prostate cancer screening with PSA. RESULTS: Eighty-seven percent (155/178) of male physicians aged, 50 and older and 21% (31/150) of white male physicians under age 50 reported having had a PSA test. More urologists than nonurologists in both age groups reported having had a screening PSA test. CONCLUSION: Most physicians aged 50 and older report undergoing PSA testing. This may reflect a belief in its efficacy and contribute to its widespread use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-259
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

Prostate-Specific Antigen
Early Detection of Cancer
Prostatic Neoplasms
Physicians
Family Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Postal Service
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mortality
Urologists

Keywords

  • Informed decision making
  • Physician practice
  • Prostate cancer screening
  • Prostate specific antigen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Brief report : Physicians and their personal prostate cancer-screening practices with prostate-specific antigen - A national survey. / Chan, Evelyn C Y; Barry, Michael J.; Vernon, Sally W.; Ahn, Chul.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 257-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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