Can a direct IADL measure detect deficits in persons with MCI?

Dani L. Binegar, Linda S. Hynan, Laura H. Lacritz, Myron F. Weiner, C. Munro Cullum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine if a direct measure of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) scale designed for use with dementia patients can detect differences between persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and normal elderly control subjects (NC). Methods: This study used cross-sectional and longitudinal IADL scale data from MCI and NC subjects followed at an Alzheimer's Disease Center. Results: On a 52-point scale, MCI subjects (n = 30) scored significantly lower than NC subjects (n = 30) on the IADL scale (total score 47.17 vs. 48.77 points; t (58) = 2.34, p = .011) and its Memory subscale (5.27 vs. 6.6 points; t (58) = 3.29, p = .002). Examination of annualized IADL scale change scores revealed that 50% of MCI subjects had declined by one point, compared with 29% of NC. Conclusion: A direct IADL measure for dementia patients is able to detect small differences between MCI and NC and cross-sectionally and longitudinally, but does not distinguish between groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-51
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Alzheimer Research
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Keywords

  • IADL
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Texas functional living scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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