Cardiology and the Critical Care Crisis. A Perspective

Jason N. Katz, Aslan T. Turer, Richard C. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With an aging U.S. population and a declining physician supply, the care of critically ill patients will soon be reaching a level of crisis. At the same time, the evidence continues to mount in support of intensivist staffing to improve both patient outcomes and resource utilization in intensive care units (ICUs). Whereas the vast majority of medical and surgical ICUs are staffed by physicians trained in critical care medicine, that is not commonly the case in coronary care units (CCUs) in this country. Despite that, the breadth and diversity of comorbidities in patients that occupy our CCU beds is continuously growing. No longer is the CCU merely an observation unit for peri-infarction complications, but rather it has truly become an ICU for patients with cardiovascular disease. With this in mind, there becomes a growing need for intensivist-trained cardiologists and a push for the development of critical care training pathways in our cardiovascular fellowship programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1279-1282
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume49
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 27 2007

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Critical Care
Cardiology
Coronary Care Units
Intensive Care Units
Physicians
Critical Illness
Infarction
Comorbidity
Cardiovascular Diseases
Observation
Medicine
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Cardiology and the Critical Care Crisis. A Perspective. / Katz, Jason N.; Turer, Aslan T.; Becker, Richard C.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 49, No. 12, 27.03.2007, p. 1279-1282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katz, Jason N. ; Turer, Aslan T. ; Becker, Richard C. / Cardiology and the Critical Care Crisis. A Perspective. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2007 ; Vol. 49, No. 12. pp. 1279-1282.
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