Caveolae, transmembrane signalling and cellular transformation.

M. P. Lisanti, Z. Tang, P. E. Scherer, E. Kübler, A. J. Koleske, M. Sargiacomo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caveolae are approximately 50-100 nm membrane micro-invaginations associated with the plasma membrane of a wide variety of cells. Although they were first identified in transmission electron micrographs approximately 40 years ago, their exact function(s) has remained controversial. Two well-established functions include: (1) the transcytosis of both large and small molecules across capillary endothelial cells and (2) the utilization of GPI-linked proteins to concentrate small molecules in caveolae for translocation to the cytoplasm (termed potocytosis). Recently, interest in a 'third' proposed caveolar function, namely transmembrane signalling, has been revived by the identification of caveolin--a transformation-dependent v-Src substrate and caveolar marker protein--and the isolation of caveolin-rich membrane domains from cultured cells. Here we will discuss existing evidence that suggests a role for caveolae in signalling events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-124
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular Membrane Biology
Volume12
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1995

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Caveolae
Caveolins
GPI-Linked Proteins
Transcytosis
Membranes
Cultured Cells
Cytoplasm
Endothelial Cells
Cell Membrane
Electrons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Lisanti, M. P., Tang, Z., Scherer, P. E., Kübler, E., Koleske, A. J., & Sargiacomo, M. (1995). Caveolae, transmembrane signalling and cellular transformation. Molecular Membrane Biology, 12(1), 121-124.

Caveolae, transmembrane signalling and cellular transformation. / Lisanti, M. P.; Tang, Z.; Scherer, P. E.; Kübler, E.; Koleske, A. J.; Sargiacomo, M.

In: Molecular Membrane Biology, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.1995, p. 121-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lisanti, MP, Tang, Z, Scherer, PE, Kübler, E, Koleske, AJ & Sargiacomo, M 1995, 'Caveolae, transmembrane signalling and cellular transformation.', Molecular Membrane Biology, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 121-124.
Lisanti MP, Tang Z, Scherer PE, Kübler E, Koleske AJ, Sargiacomo M. Caveolae, transmembrane signalling and cellular transformation. Molecular Membrane Biology. 1995 Jan;12(1):121-124.
Lisanti, M. P. ; Tang, Z. ; Scherer, P. E. ; Kübler, E. ; Koleske, A. J. ; Sargiacomo, M. / Caveolae, transmembrane signalling and cellular transformation. In: Molecular Membrane Biology. 1995 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 121-124.
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