Cerebral Hemodynamics in Asphyxiated Newborns Undergoing Hypothermia Therapy: Pilot Findings Using a Multiple-Time-Scale Analysis

Lina F. Chalak, Fenghua Tian, Takashi Tarumi, Rong Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Improved quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamics in newborns might enable us to optimize cerebral perfusion. Our objective was to develop an approach to assess cerebral hemodynamics across multiple time scales during the first 72 hours of life in newborns during hypothermia therapy. Methods Spontaneous oscillations in mean arterial pressure and regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation were analyzed using a moving window correlation method with time scales ranging from 0.15 to 8 hours in this pilot methodology study. Abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome was defined by Bayley III scores and/or cerebral palsy by age 24 months using receiver operating curve. Results Multiple-time-scale correlations between the mean arterial pressure and regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation oscillations were tested in 10 asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia therapy. Large noninduced fluctuations in the blood pressure were observed during cooling in all five infants with abnormal outcomes. Notably, these infants had two distinct patterns of correlation: a positive in-phase correlation at the short time scales (15 minutes) and/or a negative antiphase correlations observed at long time scales (4 hours.). Both the in-phase (area under the curve 0.6, [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.95]) and antiphase correlations (area under the curve 0.75, [95% confidence interval 0.4-0.95]) appeared to be related to an abnormal outcome. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the time scale is an important factor that needs to be standardized in the assessment of neonatal cerebral hemodynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-36
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Neurology
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • cerebral hemodynamics
  • hypothermia
  • hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE)
  • near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)
  • neonate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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