Cerebral microbleeds

a guide to detection and interpretation

Steven M. Greenberg, Meike W. Vernooij, Charlotte Cordonnier, Anand Viswanathan, Rustam Al-Shahi Salman, Steven Warach, Lenore J. Launer, Mark A. Van Buchem, Monique MB Breteler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

886 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are increasingly recognised neuroimaging findings in individuals with cerebrovascular disease and dementia, and in normal ageing. There has been substantial progress in the understanding of CMBs in recent years, particularly in the development of newer MRI methods for the detection of CMBs and the application of these techniques to population-based samples of elderly people. In this Review, we focus on these recent developments and their effects on two main questions: how CMBs are detected, and how CMBs should be interpreted. The number of CMBs detected depends on MRI characteristics, such as pulse sequence, sequence parameters, spatial resolution, magnetic field strength, and image post-processing, emphasising the importance of taking into account MRI technique in the interpretation of study results. Recent investigations with sensitive MRI techniques have indicated a high prevalence of CMBs in community-dwelling elderly people. We propose a procedural guide for identification of CMBs and suggest possible future approaches for elucidating the role of these common lesions as markers for, and contributors to, small-vessel brain disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-174
Number of pages10
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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Independent Living
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Magnetic Fields
Neuroimaging
Dementia
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Greenberg, S. M., Vernooij, M. W., Cordonnier, C., Viswanathan, A., Al-Shahi Salman, R., Warach, S., ... Breteler, M. MB. (2009). Cerebral microbleeds: a guide to detection and interpretation. The Lancet Neurology, 8(2), 165-174. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(09)70013-4

Cerebral microbleeds : a guide to detection and interpretation. / Greenberg, Steven M.; Vernooij, Meike W.; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Viswanathan, Anand; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Warach, Steven; Launer, Lenore J.; Van Buchem, Mark A.; Breteler, Monique MB.

In: The Lancet Neurology, Vol. 8, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 165-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenberg, SM, Vernooij, MW, Cordonnier, C, Viswanathan, A, Al-Shahi Salman, R, Warach, S, Launer, LJ, Van Buchem, MA & Breteler, MMB 2009, 'Cerebral microbleeds: a guide to detection and interpretation', The Lancet Neurology, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 165-174. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(09)70013-4
Greenberg SM, Vernooij MW, Cordonnier C, Viswanathan A, Al-Shahi Salman R, Warach S et al. Cerebral microbleeds: a guide to detection and interpretation. The Lancet Neurology. 2009 Feb;8(2):165-174. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(09)70013-4
Greenberg, Steven M. ; Vernooij, Meike W. ; Cordonnier, Charlotte ; Viswanathan, Anand ; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam ; Warach, Steven ; Launer, Lenore J. ; Van Buchem, Mark A. ; Breteler, Monique MB. / Cerebral microbleeds : a guide to detection and interpretation. In: The Lancet Neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 165-174.
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