Changes in blood center red blood cell distributions in the era of patient blood management: the trends for collection (TFC) study

on behalf of the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusions (BEST) Collaborative

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: As patient blood management becomes more widespread, fewer red blood cell (RBC) units have been transfused. This multinational study evaluated changes in blood center RBC distributions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on number and ABO and D groups of RBC distributions were obtained from several large American blood centers and national or provincial blood services (NPBS) from fiscal year (FY) 2010 through FY2014. Due to relatively larger numbers of distributions and differences in ABO and D groups between the Japanese Red Cross and the other NPBS, Japanese data were not included in distributions calculations. RESULTS: Data from seven American blood centers and eight NPBS were obtained. Overall, at both the American and the seven NPBS that were analyzed, there were declines in the number of RBC distributions between FY2010 and FY2014, 16.9 and 8.0%, respectively. The number of O– RBC distributions decreased by 9.0% at American blood centers but the proportion of RBC distributions that were O– increased by 9.3% during this time. The NPBS had 1.6% increase in O– RBC distributions and 10.5% increase in the proportion of O– distributions. The proportion of O+ distributions increased slightly over time at American centers (2.9%) while decreasing slightly (1.1%) at NPBS despite reductions in the absolute numbers of O+ distributions. Overall there was 2.6% decrease in the proportion of B+ and AB+ RBCs distributed and 13.6% absolute reduction in the number of these units distributed. CONCLUSION: Although overall RBC distributions have decreased over time, the proportion of O units has increased substantially.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1965-1973
Number of pages9
JournalTransfusion
Volume56
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Erythrocytes
Red Cross

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Hematology

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Changes in blood center red blood cell distributions in the era of patient blood management : the trends for collection (TFC) study. / on behalf of the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusions (BEST) Collaborative.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 56, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 1965-1973.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

on behalf of the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusions (BEST) Collaborative 2016, 'Changes in blood center red blood cell distributions in the era of patient blood management: the trends for collection (TFC) study', Transfusion, vol. 56, no. 8, pp. 1965-1973. https://doi.org/10.1111/trf.13696
on behalf of the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusions (BEST) Collaborative. Changes in blood center red blood cell distributions in the era of patient blood management: the trends for collection (TFC) study. Transfusion. 2016 Aug 1;56(8):1965-1973. https://doi.org/10.1111/trf.13696
on behalf of the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusions (BEST) Collaborative. / Changes in blood center red blood cell distributions in the era of patient blood management : the trends for collection (TFC) study. In: Transfusion. 2016 ; Vol. 56, No. 8. pp. 1965-1973.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: As patient blood management becomes more widespread, fewer red blood cell (RBC) units have been transfused. This multinational study evaluated changes in blood center RBC distributions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on number and ABO and D groups of RBC distributions were obtained from several large American blood centers and national or provincial blood services (NPBS) from fiscal year (FY) 2010 through FY2014. Due to relatively larger numbers of distributions and differences in ABO and D groups between the Japanese Red Cross and the other NPBS, Japanese data were not included in distributions calculations. RESULTS: Data from seven American blood centers and eight NPBS were obtained. Overall, at both the American and the seven NPBS that were analyzed, there were declines in the number of RBC distributions between FY2010 and FY2014, 16.9 and 8.0{\%}, respectively. The number of O– RBC distributions decreased by 9.0{\%} at American blood centers but the proportion of RBC distributions that were O– increased by 9.3{\%} during this time. The NPBS had 1.6{\%} increase in O– RBC distributions and 10.5{\%} increase in the proportion of O– distributions. The proportion of O+ distributions increased slightly over time at American centers (2.9{\%}) while decreasing slightly (1.1{\%}) at NPBS despite reductions in the absolute numbers of O+ distributions. Overall there was 2.6{\%} decrease in the proportion of B+ and AB+ RBCs distributed and 13.6{\%} absolute reduction in the number of these units distributed. CONCLUSION: Although overall RBC distributions have decreased over time, the proportion of O units has increased substantially.",
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T1 - Changes in blood center red blood cell distributions in the era of patient blood management

T2 - the trends for collection (TFC) study

AU - on behalf of the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusions (BEST) Collaborative

AU - Yazer, Mark H.

AU - Jackson, Bryon

AU - Beckman, Neil

AU - Chesneau, Stuart

AU - Bowler, Patrick

AU - Delaney, Meghan

AU - Devine, Dana

AU - Field, Stephen

AU - Germain, Marc

AU - Murphy, Mike F.

AU - Sayers, Merlyn

AU - Shaz, Beth

AU - Shinar, Eilat

AU - Takanashi, Minoko

AU - Vassallo, Ralph

AU - Wickenden, Crispin

AU - Yahalom, Vered

AU - Land, Kevin

PY - 2016/8/1

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N2 - BACKGROUND: As patient blood management becomes more widespread, fewer red blood cell (RBC) units have been transfused. This multinational study evaluated changes in blood center RBC distributions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on number and ABO and D groups of RBC distributions were obtained from several large American blood centers and national or provincial blood services (NPBS) from fiscal year (FY) 2010 through FY2014. Due to relatively larger numbers of distributions and differences in ABO and D groups between the Japanese Red Cross and the other NPBS, Japanese data were not included in distributions calculations. RESULTS: Data from seven American blood centers and eight NPBS were obtained. Overall, at both the American and the seven NPBS that were analyzed, there were declines in the number of RBC distributions between FY2010 and FY2014, 16.9 and 8.0%, respectively. The number of O– RBC distributions decreased by 9.0% at American blood centers but the proportion of RBC distributions that were O– increased by 9.3% during this time. The NPBS had 1.6% increase in O– RBC distributions and 10.5% increase in the proportion of O– distributions. The proportion of O+ distributions increased slightly over time at American centers (2.9%) while decreasing slightly (1.1%) at NPBS despite reductions in the absolute numbers of O+ distributions. Overall there was 2.6% decrease in the proportion of B+ and AB+ RBCs distributed and 13.6% absolute reduction in the number of these units distributed. CONCLUSION: Although overall RBC distributions have decreased over time, the proportion of O units has increased substantially.

AB - BACKGROUND: As patient blood management becomes more widespread, fewer red blood cell (RBC) units have been transfused. This multinational study evaluated changes in blood center RBC distributions. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on number and ABO and D groups of RBC distributions were obtained from several large American blood centers and national or provincial blood services (NPBS) from fiscal year (FY) 2010 through FY2014. Due to relatively larger numbers of distributions and differences in ABO and D groups between the Japanese Red Cross and the other NPBS, Japanese data were not included in distributions calculations. RESULTS: Data from seven American blood centers and eight NPBS were obtained. Overall, at both the American and the seven NPBS that were analyzed, there were declines in the number of RBC distributions between FY2010 and FY2014, 16.9 and 8.0%, respectively. The number of O– RBC distributions decreased by 9.0% at American blood centers but the proportion of RBC distributions that were O– increased by 9.3% during this time. The NPBS had 1.6% increase in O– RBC distributions and 10.5% increase in the proportion of O– distributions. The proportion of O+ distributions increased slightly over time at American centers (2.9%) while decreasing slightly (1.1%) at NPBS despite reductions in the absolute numbers of O+ distributions. Overall there was 2.6% decrease in the proportion of B+ and AB+ RBCs distributed and 13.6% absolute reduction in the number of these units distributed. CONCLUSION: Although overall RBC distributions have decreased over time, the proportion of O units has increased substantially.

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