Changes in cognitive performance in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy following selective dorsal rhizotomy

S. Craft, T. S. Park, D. A. White, J. Schatz, M. Noetzel, S. Arnold

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children with cerebral palsy who receive selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) for treatment of spasticity may show suprasegmental changes in upper limb function and control of speech musculature. Anecdotal reports suggest that suprasegmental effects may extend to cognitive functions such as attention and language. This study examined the performance of 16 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy on tests of visual attention and other cognitive functions 1 day prior to and 6 months following SDR. Children undergoing SDR were compared with 9 children with spastic diplegia, matched for severity of cerebral palsy and amount of therapy, who did not receive SDR, and 24 age- and sex-matched normal children tested at initial and 6-month follow-up sessions. Children with cerebral palsy treated with SDR showed disproportionately greater improvement in specific attentional and cognitive operations than either of the other groups. These results document cognitive changes following SDR which heretofore were reported anecdotally. This improvement may be due to improved mood, reduced physical discomfort, increased therapeutic intervention, or possible cortical effects of SDR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-75
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Neurosurgery
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Cognitive function
  • Inhibition
  • Selective dorsal rhizotomy
  • Visual processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in cognitive performance in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy following selective dorsal rhizotomy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this