Changes in resting state MRI networks from a single season of football distinguishes controls, low, and high head impact exposure

Gowtham Murugesan, Afarin Famili, Elizabeth Davenport, Ben Wagner, Jillian Urban, Mireille Kelley, Derek Jones, Christopher Whitlow, Joel Stitzel, Joseph A Maldjian, Albert Montillo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sub-concussive asymptomatic head impacts during contact sports may develop potential neurological changes and may have accumulative effect through repetitive occurrences in contact sports like American football. The effects of sub-concussive head impacts on the functional connectivity of the brain are still unclear with no conclusive results yet presented. Although various studies have been performed on the topic, they have yielded mixed results with some concluding that sub concussive head impacts do not have any effect on functional connectivity, while others concluding that there are acute to chronic effects. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is an effect on the functional connectivity of the brain from repetitive sub concussive head impacts. First, we applied a model free group ICA based intrinsic network selection to consider the relationship between all voxels while avoiding an arbitrary choice of seed selection. Second, unlike most other studies, we have utilized the default mode network along with other extracted intrinsic networks for classification. Third, we systematically tested multiple supervised machine learning classification algorithms to predict whether a player was a non-contact sports youth player, a contact sports player with low levels of cumulative biomechanical force impacts, or one with high levels of exposure. The 10-fold cross validation results show robust classification between the groups with accuracy up to 78% establishing the potential of data driven approaches coupled with machine learning to study connectivity changes in youth football players. This work adds to the growing body of evidence that there are detectable changes in brain signature from playing a single season of contact sports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE 14th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISBI 2017
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages464-467
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781509011711
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 15 2017
Event14th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISBI 2017 - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: Apr 18 2017Apr 21 2017

Other

Other14th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISBI 2017
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period4/18/174/21/17

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Machine learning
  • Resting state networks
  • Sub-concussive head impact
  • Youth football

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Murugesan, G., Famili, A., Davenport, E., Wagner, B., Urban, J., Kelley, M., ... Montillo, A. (2017). Changes in resting state MRI networks from a single season of football distinguishes controls, low, and high head impact exposure. In 2017 IEEE 14th International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging, ISBI 2017 (pp. 464-467). [7950561] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2017.7950561