Chemically patterned, metal-oxide-based surfaces produced by photolithographic techniques for studying protein- and cell-interactions. II: Protein adsorption and early cell interactions

Colin A. Scotchford, M. Ball, M. Winkelmann, J. Vörös, C. Csucs, D. M. Brunette, G. Danuser, M. Textor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

Protein adsorption and adhesion of primary human osteoblasts on chemically patterned, metal-oxide-based surfaces comprising combinations of titanium, aluminium, vanadium and niobium were investigated. Single metal samples with a homogeneous surface and bimetal samples with a surface pattern produced by photolithographic techniques were used. The physical and chemical properties of the samples have been extensively characterised and are presented in a companion paper. Here, we describe their properties in terms of cell responses during the initial 24h of cell culture. Regarding the cell number and activity there was no significant difference between any of the single metal surfaces. However the morphology of cells on vanadium surfaces became spindle-like. In contrast to the behaviour on single metal samples, cells exhibited a pronounced reaction on bimetallic surfaces that contained aluminium. Cells tended to stay away from aluminium, which was the least favoured metal in all two-metal combinations. An initial cell alignment relative to the pattern geometry was detectable after 2h and was fully developed after 18h of incubation. The organisation of f-actin and microtubules as well as the localisation of vinculin were all more pronounced on non-aluminium regions. We hypothesised that the differences in cell response could be associated with differences in the adsorption of serum proteins onto the various metal oxides. Protein adsorption experiments were performed using microscopy in conjunction with immunofluorescent stains. They indicated that both fibronectin and albumin adsorption were significantly greater on the non-aluminium regions, suggesting that differences in cellular response correlate with a modulation of the concentration of serum proteins on the surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1147-1158
Number of pages12
JournalBiomaterials
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

Keywords

  • Albumin
  • Aluminium
  • Cell surface interaction
  • Fibronectin
  • Niobium
  • Osteoblast
  • Surface chemistry
  • Titanium
  • Vanadium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

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