Children with Chronic Hepatitis B in the United States and Canada

Hepatitis B Research Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that children with chronic hepatitis B living in the US and Canada would have international origins and characteristic hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and laboratory profiles.

STUDY DESIGN: Clinical characteristics of children enrolled in the Hepatitis B Research Network were collected from 7 US and Canadian centers.

RESULTS: Children (n = 343) with an age range of 1.0-17.8 years were enrolled; 78% of the children were Asian, 55% were adopted, and 97% had international origins with either the child or a parent born in 1 of 31 countries. The majority had HBV genotype B (43%) or C (32%), and the remainder had genotype A (5%), D (16%), E (4%), or multiple (<1%). Children with genotype B or C were more likely to be Asian (98% and 96%), more consistently hepatitis B envelope antigen positive (95% and 82%), had higher median HBV DNA levels (8.2 and 8.3 log10 IU/mL), and less frequently had elevated alanine aminotransferase values (43% and 57%) compared with children with other genotypes. The percentage of hepatitis B envelope antigen positivity and of those with HBV DNA ≥6 log₁₀ IU/mL declined with age.

CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children in the Hepatitis B Research Network have HBV genotypes that reflect their international origins. Clinical and laboratory data differ substantially by patient age and HBV genotype. Use of these data can help drive the development of optimal strategies to manage and treat children with chronic hepatitis B.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1287-1294
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume167
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Chronic Hepatitis B
Canada
Hepatitis B virus
Genotype
Hepatitis B Antigens
Hepatitis B
DNA
Alanine Transaminase
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Children with Chronic Hepatitis B in the United States and Canada. / Hepatitis B Research Network.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 167, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 1287-1294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hepatitis B Research Network. / Children with Chronic Hepatitis B in the United States and Canada. In: The Journal of Pediatrics. 2015 ; Vol. 167, No. 6. pp. 1287-1294.
@article{afb995deb0f042aebedf5c1b95e04e10,
title = "Children with Chronic Hepatitis B in the United States and Canada",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that children with chronic hepatitis B living in the US and Canada would have international origins and characteristic hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and laboratory profiles.STUDY DESIGN: Clinical characteristics of children enrolled in the Hepatitis B Research Network were collected from 7 US and Canadian centers.RESULTS: Children (n = 343) with an age range of 1.0-17.8 years were enrolled; 78{\%} of the children were Asian, 55{\%} were adopted, and 97{\%} had international origins with either the child or a parent born in 1 of 31 countries. The majority had HBV genotype B (43{\%}) or C (32{\%}), and the remainder had genotype A (5{\%}), D (16{\%}), E (4{\%}), or multiple (<1{\%}). Children with genotype B or C were more likely to be Asian (98{\%} and 96{\%}), more consistently hepatitis B envelope antigen positive (95{\%} and 82{\%}), had higher median HBV DNA levels (8.2 and 8.3 log10 IU/mL), and less frequently had elevated alanine aminotransferase values (43{\%} and 57{\%}) compared with children with other genotypes. The percentage of hepatitis B envelope antigen positivity and of those with HBV DNA ≥6 log₁₀ IU/mL declined with age.CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children in the Hepatitis B Research Network have HBV genotypes that reflect their international origins. Clinical and laboratory data differ substantially by patient age and HBV genotype. Use of these data can help drive the development of optimal strategies to manage and treat children with chronic hepatitis B.",
author = "{Hepatitis B Research Network} and Schwarz, {Kathleen B.} and Cloonan, {Yona Keich} and Ling, {Simon C.} and Murray, {Karen F.} and Norberto Rodriguez-Baez and Schwarzenberg, {Sarah Jane} and Jeffrey Teckman and Lilia Ganova-Raeva and Philip Rosenthal",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.08.021",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "167",
pages = "1287--1294",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children with Chronic Hepatitis B in the United States and Canada

AU - Hepatitis B Research Network

AU - Schwarz, Kathleen B.

AU - Cloonan, Yona Keich

AU - Ling, Simon C.

AU - Murray, Karen F.

AU - Rodriguez-Baez, Norberto

AU - Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane

AU - Teckman, Jeffrey

AU - Ganova-Raeva, Lilia

AU - Rosenthal, Philip

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that children with chronic hepatitis B living in the US and Canada would have international origins and characteristic hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and laboratory profiles.STUDY DESIGN: Clinical characteristics of children enrolled in the Hepatitis B Research Network were collected from 7 US and Canadian centers.RESULTS: Children (n = 343) with an age range of 1.0-17.8 years were enrolled; 78% of the children were Asian, 55% were adopted, and 97% had international origins with either the child or a parent born in 1 of 31 countries. The majority had HBV genotype B (43%) or C (32%), and the remainder had genotype A (5%), D (16%), E (4%), or multiple (<1%). Children with genotype B or C were more likely to be Asian (98% and 96%), more consistently hepatitis B envelope antigen positive (95% and 82%), had higher median HBV DNA levels (8.2 and 8.3 log10 IU/mL), and less frequently had elevated alanine aminotransferase values (43% and 57%) compared with children with other genotypes. The percentage of hepatitis B envelope antigen positivity and of those with HBV DNA ≥6 log₁₀ IU/mL declined with age.CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children in the Hepatitis B Research Network have HBV genotypes that reflect their international origins. Clinical and laboratory data differ substantially by patient age and HBV genotype. Use of these data can help drive the development of optimal strategies to manage and treat children with chronic hepatitis B.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that children with chronic hepatitis B living in the US and Canada would have international origins and characteristic hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and laboratory profiles.STUDY DESIGN: Clinical characteristics of children enrolled in the Hepatitis B Research Network were collected from 7 US and Canadian centers.RESULTS: Children (n = 343) with an age range of 1.0-17.8 years were enrolled; 78% of the children were Asian, 55% were adopted, and 97% had international origins with either the child or a parent born in 1 of 31 countries. The majority had HBV genotype B (43%) or C (32%), and the remainder had genotype A (5%), D (16%), E (4%), or multiple (<1%). Children with genotype B or C were more likely to be Asian (98% and 96%), more consistently hepatitis B envelope antigen positive (95% and 82%), had higher median HBV DNA levels (8.2 and 8.3 log10 IU/mL), and less frequently had elevated alanine aminotransferase values (43% and 57%) compared with children with other genotypes. The percentage of hepatitis B envelope antigen positivity and of those with HBV DNA ≥6 log₁₀ IU/mL declined with age.CONCLUSIONS: The majority of children in the Hepatitis B Research Network have HBV genotypes that reflect their international origins. Clinical and laboratory data differ substantially by patient age and HBV genotype. Use of these data can help drive the development of optimal strategies to manage and treat children with chronic hepatitis B.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027926289&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027926289&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.08.021

DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.08.021

M3 - Article

C2 - 26364985

AN - SCOPUS:85027926289

VL - 167

SP - 1287

EP - 1294

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

IS - 6

ER -