Cholesterol and coronary heart disease

Future directions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of high serum cholesterol levels as a risk factor for coronary heart disease and the benefit of lowering cholesterol levels for reducing risk are being increasingly accepted. A broad consensus to this effect has led to the establishment of the National Cholesterol Education Program. Although the available evidence fully justifies this program, its practical application to the American public has generated a series of new questions that must be explored. For example, it can be questioned whether reduction in coronary risk through lowering cholesterol levels extends to both sexes and all age groups. For people with high cholesterol levels, dietary modification is undoubtedly the first step of management, but the fraction of people responding adequately to dietary change remains to be determined. Finally, indications for drug therapy and choice of drugs need further exploration, particularly in the area of cost vs benefit. Thus, continuing research must be carried out in parallel with clinical and public health application of cholesterol education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3053-3059
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume264
Issue number23
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Coronary Disease
Cholesterol
Hypercholesterolemia
Diet Therapy
Education
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Public Health
Age Groups
Drug Therapy
Direction compound
Serum
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cholesterol and coronary heart disease : Future directions. / Grundy, Scott M.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 264, No. 23, 1990, p. 3053-3059.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{508b0c060e3a49928a9a04b9072f8104,
title = "Cholesterol and coronary heart disease: Future directions",
abstract = "The importance of high serum cholesterol levels as a risk factor for coronary heart disease and the benefit of lowering cholesterol levels for reducing risk are being increasingly accepted. A broad consensus to this effect has led to the establishment of the National Cholesterol Education Program. Although the available evidence fully justifies this program, its practical application to the American public has generated a series of new questions that must be explored. For example, it can be questioned whether reduction in coronary risk through lowering cholesterol levels extends to both sexes and all age groups. For people with high cholesterol levels, dietary modification is undoubtedly the first step of management, but the fraction of people responding adequately to dietary change remains to be determined. Finally, indications for drug therapy and choice of drugs need further exploration, particularly in the area of cost vs benefit. Thus, continuing research must be carried out in parallel with clinical and public health application of cholesterol education.",
author = "Grundy, {Scott M}",
year = "1990",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "264",
pages = "3053--3059",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0098-7484",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "23",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cholesterol and coronary heart disease

T2 - Future directions

AU - Grundy, Scott M

PY - 1990

Y1 - 1990

N2 - The importance of high serum cholesterol levels as a risk factor for coronary heart disease and the benefit of lowering cholesterol levels for reducing risk are being increasingly accepted. A broad consensus to this effect has led to the establishment of the National Cholesterol Education Program. Although the available evidence fully justifies this program, its practical application to the American public has generated a series of new questions that must be explored. For example, it can be questioned whether reduction in coronary risk through lowering cholesterol levels extends to both sexes and all age groups. For people with high cholesterol levels, dietary modification is undoubtedly the first step of management, but the fraction of people responding adequately to dietary change remains to be determined. Finally, indications for drug therapy and choice of drugs need further exploration, particularly in the area of cost vs benefit. Thus, continuing research must be carried out in parallel with clinical and public health application of cholesterol education.

AB - The importance of high serum cholesterol levels as a risk factor for coronary heart disease and the benefit of lowering cholesterol levels for reducing risk are being increasingly accepted. A broad consensus to this effect has led to the establishment of the National Cholesterol Education Program. Although the available evidence fully justifies this program, its practical application to the American public has generated a series of new questions that must be explored. For example, it can be questioned whether reduction in coronary risk through lowering cholesterol levels extends to both sexes and all age groups. For people with high cholesterol levels, dietary modification is undoubtedly the first step of management, but the fraction of people responding adequately to dietary change remains to be determined. Finally, indications for drug therapy and choice of drugs need further exploration, particularly in the area of cost vs benefit. Thus, continuing research must be carried out in parallel with clinical and public health application of cholesterol education.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025597966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025597966&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 264

SP - 3053

EP - 3059

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0098-7484

IS - 23

ER -