Chronic Use of Aspirin and Total White Matter Lesion Volume: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

Andrea Holcombe, Eric Ammann, Mark A. Espeland, Brendan J. Kelley, Jo Ann E. Manson, Robert Wallace, Jennifer Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To investigate the relationship between aspirin and subclinical cerebrovascular heath, we evaluated the effect of chronic aspirin use on white matter lesions (WML) volume among women. Methods Chronic aspirin use was assessed in 1365 women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Differences in WML volumes between aspirin users and nonusers were assessed with linear mixed models. A number of secondary analyses were performed, including lobe-specific analyses, subgroup analyses based on participants’ overall risk of cerebrovascular disease, and a dose–response relationship analysis. Results The mean age of the women at magnetic resonance imaging examination was 77.6 years. Sixty-one percent of participants were chronic aspirin users. After adjusting for demographic variables and comorbidities, chronic aspirin use was nonsignificantly associated with 4.8% (95% CI: −6.8%, 17.9%) larger WML volumes. These null findings were confirmed in secondary and sensitivity analyses, including an active comparator evaluation where aspirin users were compared to users of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen. Conclusions There was a nonsignificant difference in WML volumes between aspirin users and nonusers. Further, our results suggest that chronic aspirin use may not have a clinically significant effect on WML volumes in women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2128-2136
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Keywords

  • antiplatelet
  • aspirin
  • cognition
  • Epidemiology
  • NSAID
  • white matter lesions
  • women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Chronic Use of Aspirin and Total White Matter Lesion Volume: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this