Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling

Kevin K. Lin, Vivek Kumar, Mikhail Geyfman, Darya Chudova, Alexander T. Ihler, Padhraic Smyth, Ralf Paus, Joseph S. Takahashi, Bogi Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hair follicles undergo recurrent cycling of controlled growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative quiescence (telogen) with a defined periodicity. Taking a genomics approach to study gene expression during synchronized mouse hair follicle cycling, we discovered that, in addition to circadian fluctuation, CLOCK-regulated genes are also modulated in phase with the hair growth cycle. During telogen and early anagen, circadian clock genes are prominently expressed in the secondary hair germ, which contains precursor cells for the growing follicle. Analysis of Clock and Bmal1 mutant mice reveals a delay in anagen progression, and the secondary hair germ cells show decreased levels of phosphorylated Rb and lack mitotic cells, suggesting that circadian clock genes regulate anagen progression via their effect on the cell cycle. Consistent with a block at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, we show a significant upregulation of p21 in Bmal1 mutant skin. While circadian clock mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of diurnal biological processes, our findings indicate that circadian clock genes may be utilized to modulate the progression of non-diurnal cyclic processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1000573
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

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Circadian Clocks
hair follicles
Hair Follicle
hair
circadian rhythm
Hair
hairs
gene
Genes
cell cycle
Cell Cycle
genes
Biological Phenomena
mutants
mice
G1 Phase
Periodicity
Growth
Genomics
skin (animal)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Lin, K. K., Kumar, V., Geyfman, M., Chudova, D., Ihler, A. T., Smyth, P., ... Andersen, B. (2009). Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling. PLoS Genetics, 5(7), [e1000573]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000573

Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling. / Lin, Kevin K.; Kumar, Vivek; Geyfman, Mikhail; Chudova, Darya; Ihler, Alexander T.; Smyth, Padhraic; Paus, Ralf; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi.

In: PLoS Genetics, Vol. 5, No. 7, e1000573, 07.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, KK, Kumar, V, Geyfman, M, Chudova, D, Ihler, AT, Smyth, P, Paus, R, Takahashi, JS & Andersen, B 2009, 'Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling', PLoS Genetics, vol. 5, no. 7, e1000573. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000573
Lin KK, Kumar V, Geyfman M, Chudova D, Ihler AT, Smyth P et al. Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling. PLoS Genetics. 2009 Jul;5(7). e1000573. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000573
Lin, Kevin K. ; Kumar, Vivek ; Geyfman, Mikhail ; Chudova, Darya ; Ihler, Alexander T. ; Smyth, Padhraic ; Paus, Ralf ; Takahashi, Joseph S. ; Andersen, Bogi. / Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling. In: PLoS Genetics. 2009 ; Vol. 5, No. 7.
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