Clinical implications of caveolins in malignancy and their potential as therapeutic targets

Ila Tamaskar, Ming Zhou

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Caveolae are cell membrane invaginations that were first described in the early 1950s. Since then, researchers have undertaken numerous studies to define their role in normal physiology and disease. The caveolin proteins, particularly caveolin-1, are the major structural and functional components of caveolae, which are involved in a plethora of cellular functions. This review briefly describes the role of caveolae and caveolin proteins in these cellular processes and in different types of human cancers. In addition, it also discusses the use of caveolin-1 as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker and therapeutic target.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-106
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent oncology reports
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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