Clinician ratings vs. global ratings of symptom severity: A comparison of symptom measures in the bipolar disorder module, phase II, Texas Medication Algorithm Project

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study compares ratings obtained with an itemized, clinician-rated, symptom severity measure - the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS24) - to a Physician Global Rating Scale (PhGRS), a Patient Global Rating Scale (PtGRS) and the clinician-completed Multnomah Community Ability Scale (MCAS) in patients with bipolar disorder (BPD). A total of 69 patients (25 inpatients and 44 outpatients) with BPD were enrolled in a feasibility study of the use of medication algorithms in the treatment of BPD. Clinicians at each visit completed the BPRS24, PhGRS and MCAS, and patients completed the PtGRS. Analyses compared the BPRS24 and BPRS subscales with the PtGRS, PhGRS and MCAS. PtGRS scores correlated poorly with BPRS24 and with PhGRS scores at baseline, although PtGRS change scores correlated moderately with BPRS24 change scores. Baseline BPRS24 and PhGRS scores correlated moderately at baseline with somewhat stronger correlations found on change scores for the two measures. MCAS scores showed moderate correlations with BPRS24 scores both at baseline and with change over time. Global assessments by patients or physicians only moderately or poorly reflected BPRS24 scores. Itemized symptom measures to gauge severity of illness or change over time are preferred over patient or physician global judgments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-175
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry research
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2003

Keywords

  • Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale
  • Functioning
  • Mood disorder
  • Outcome measure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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