Clock controls circadian period in isolated suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

Erik D. Herzog, Joseph S. Takahashi, Gene D. Block

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian pacemaker in mammals, and one molecular regulator of circadian rhythms is the Clock gene. Here we studied the discharge patterns of SCN neurons isolated from Clock mutant mice. Long-term, multielectrode recordings showed that heterozygous Clock mutant neurons have lengthened periods and that homozygous Clock neurons are arrhythmic, paralleling the effects on locomotor activity in the animal. In addition, cells in dispersals expressed a wider range of periods and phase relationships than cells in explants. These results suggest that the Clock gene is required for circadian rhythmicity in individual SCN cells and that a mechanism within the SCN synchronizes neurons and restricts the range of expressed circadian periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)708-713
Number of pages6
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume1
Issue number8
StatePublished - Dec 1998

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Circadian Clocks
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Neurons
Periodicity
Locomotion
Circadian Rhythm
Genes
Mammals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Clock controls circadian period in isolated suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons. / Herzog, Erik D.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Block, Gene D.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 1, No. 8, 12.1998, p. 708-713.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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