Clopidogrel use and long-term clinical outcomes after drug-eluting stent implantation

Eric L. Eisenstein, Kevin J. Anstrom, David F. Kong, Linda K. Shaw, Robert H. Tuttle, Daniel B. Mark, Judith M. Kramer, Robert A. Harrington, David B. Matchar, David E. Kandzari, Eric D. Peterson, Kevin A. Schulman, Robert M. Califf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Context: Recent studies of drug-eluting intracoronary stents suggest that current antiplatelet regimens may not be sufficient to prevent late stent thrombosis. Objective: To assess the association between clopidogrel use and long-term clinical outcomes of patients receiving drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) for treatment of coronary artery disease. Design, Setting, and Patients: An observational study examining consecutive patients receiving intracoronary stents at Duke Heart Center, a tertiary care medical center in Durham, NC, between January 1, 2000, and July 31, 2005, with follow-up contact at 6, 12, and 24 months through September 7, 2006. Study population included 4666 patients undergoing initial percutaneous coronary intervention with BMS (n=3165) or DES (n=1501). Landmark analyses were performed among patients who were event-free (no death, myocardial infarction [MI], or revascularization) at 6- and 12-month follow-up. At these points, patients were divided into 4 groups based on stent type and self-reported clopidogrel use: DES with clopidogrel, DES without clopidogrel, BMS with clopidogrel, and BMS without clopidogrel. Main Outcome Measures: Death, nonfatal MI, and the composite of death or MI at 24-month follow-up. Results: Among patients with DES who were event-free at 6 months (637 with and 579 without clopidogrel), clopidogrel use was a significant predictor of lower adjusted rates of death (2.0% with vs 5.3% without; difference, -3.3%; 95% CI, -6.3% to -0.3%; P=.03) and death or MI (3.1% vs 7.2%; difference, -4.1%; 95% CI, -7.6% to -0.6%; P=.02) at 24 months. However, among patients with BMS (417 with and 1976 without clopidogrel), there were no differences in death (3.7% vs 4.5%; difference, -0.7%; 95% CI, -2.9% to 1.4%; P=.50) and death or MI (5.5% vs 6.0%; difference, -0.5%; 95% CI, -3.2% to 2.2%; P=.70). Among patients with DES who were event-free at 12 months (252 with and 276 without clopidogrel), clopidogrel use continued to predict lower rates of death (0% vs 3.5%; difference, -3.5%; 95% CI, -5.9% to -1.1%; P=.004) and death or MI (0% vs 4.5%; difference, -4.5%; 95% CI, -7.1% to -1.9%; P<.001) at 24 months. However, among patients with BMS (346 with and 1644 without clopidogrel), there continued to be no differences in death (3.3% vs 2.7%; difference, 0.6%; 95% CI, -1.5% to 2.8%; P=.57) and death or MI (4.7% vs 3.6%; difference, 1.0%; 95% CI, -1.6% to 3.6%; P=.44). Conclusions: The extended use of clopidogrel in patients with DES may be associated with a reduced risk for death and death or MI. However, the appropriate duration for clopidogrel administration can only be determined within the context of a large-scale randomized clinical trial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-168
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume297
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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