Coalescence and fragmentation of cortical networks during focal seizures

Mark A. Kramer, Uri T. Eden, Eric D. Kolaczyk, Rodrigo Zepeda, Emad N. Eskandar, Sydney S. Cash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epileptic seizures reflect a pathological brain state characterized by specific clinical and electrical manifestations. The proposed mechanisms are heterogeneous but united by the supposition that epileptic activity is hypersynchronous across multiple scales, yet principled and quantitative analyses of seizure dynamics across space and throughout the entire ictal period are rare. To more completely explore spatiotemporal interactions during seizures, we examined electrocorticogram data from a population of male and femalehumanpatients with epilepsy and from these data constructed dynamic network representations using statistically robust measures.Wefound that these networks evolved through a distinct topological progression during the seizure. Surprisingly, the overall synchronization changed only weakly, whereas the topology changed dramatically in organization. A large subnetwork dominated the network architecture at seizure onset and preceding termination but, between, fractured into smaller groups.Commonnetwork characteristics appeared consistently for a population of subjects, and, for each subject, similar networks appeared from seizure to seizure. These results suggest that, at the macroscopic spatial scale, epilepsy is not so much a manifestation of hypersynchrony but instead of network reorganization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10076-10085
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume30
Issue number30
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 28 2010

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Seizures
Epilepsy
Population
Stroke
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kramer, M. A., Eden, U. T., Kolaczyk, E. D., Zepeda, R., Eskandar, E. N., & Cash, S. S. (2010). Coalescence and fragmentation of cortical networks during focal seizures. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(30), 10076-10085. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6309-09.2010

Coalescence and fragmentation of cortical networks during focal seizures. / Kramer, Mark A.; Eden, Uri T.; Kolaczyk, Eric D.; Zepeda, Rodrigo; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cash, Sydney S.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 30, No. 30, 28.07.2010, p. 10076-10085.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kramer, MA, Eden, UT, Kolaczyk, ED, Zepeda, R, Eskandar, EN & Cash, SS 2010, 'Coalescence and fragmentation of cortical networks during focal seizures', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 30, no. 30, pp. 10076-10085. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6309-09.2010
Kramer, Mark A. ; Eden, Uri T. ; Kolaczyk, Eric D. ; Zepeda, Rodrigo ; Eskandar, Emad N. ; Cash, Sydney S. / Coalescence and fragmentation of cortical networks during focal seizures. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 30, No. 30. pp. 10076-10085.
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