Cocoa products decrease low density lipoprotein oxidative susceptibility but do not affect biomarkers of inflammation in humans

Surekha Mathur, Sridevi Devaraj, Scott M Grundy, Ishwarlal Jialal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Flavonoids and related polyphenolics with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities may play a role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation. We wished to determine the effects of cocoa extract supplementation on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Healthy subjects (n = 25) were studied at baseline, after cocoa supplementation (36.9 g of dark chocolate bar and 30.95 g of cocoa powder drink) for 6 wk and after a 6-wk washout period. Fasting blood and early morning urine were collected at the three time points. Two indices of flavonoid intake, total phenols and oxygen radical absorbance capacity of plasma, were measured after an overnight fast. Neither was affected by supplementation. Measures of oxidative stress included copper-catalyzed LDL oxidation kinetics and urinary F2 isoprostanes. LDL oxidizability was lower after chocolate supplementation as evidenced by a longer lag time (P < 0.05) of conjugated diene formation (101.0 ± 20.7 min) compared with baseline (91.3 ± 18.0 min) and washout (96.4 ± 7.5 min) phases. There was no effect of chocolate on urinary F2 isoprostane levels or on markers of inflammation including the whole-blood cytokines, interleukin-1 β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and P-selectin. In conclusion, cocoa products supplementation in humans affects LDL oxidizability, but not urinary F2 isoprostanes or markers of inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3663-3667
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume132
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

cocoa products
F2-Isoprostanes
low density lipoprotein
LDL Lipoproteins
biomarkers
inflammation
Biomarkers
cocoa (beverage)
Inflammation
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
Flavonoids
flavonoids
cocoa powder
oxygen radical absorbance capacity
P-Selectin
tumor necrosis factors
Phenols
C-reactive protein
blood

Keywords

  • Chocolate
  • Cocoa
  • Flavonoids
  • Humans
  • Inflammation
  • Oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Cocoa products decrease low density lipoprotein oxidative susceptibility but do not affect biomarkers of inflammation in humans. / Mathur, Surekha; Devaraj, Sridevi; Grundy, Scott M; Jialal, Ishwarlal.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 132, No. 12, 01.12.2002, p. 3663-3667.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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