Cognitive-behavior therapy for older adults

How does it work?

Mark Floyd, Forrest Scogin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The basic premise of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is that depression is mediated by depressogenic patterns of thinking. Research with a general adult population has not consistently supported the proposed mediational effect of depressogenic thinking (Whisman, 1993), as measured by the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS; Beck, Brown, Steer, and Weissman, 1991). Our research suggests that the mediational effect of the DAS is even weaker with an older adult population. Proposed reasons for this age difference include a greater effect of the 'common factors' of psychotherapy (Ilardi and Craighead, 1994) and an increased need to specifically treat hopelessness in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-463
Number of pages5
JournalPsychotherapy
Volume35
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1998

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amsonic acid
Cognitive Therapy
Research
Psychotherapy
Population
Depression
Thinking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Floyd, M., & Scogin, F. (1998). Cognitive-behavior therapy for older adults: How does it work? Psychotherapy, 35(4), 459-463.

Cognitive-behavior therapy for older adults : How does it work? / Floyd, Mark; Scogin, Forrest.

In: Psychotherapy, Vol. 35, No. 4, 12.1998, p. 459-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Floyd, M & Scogin, F 1998, 'Cognitive-behavior therapy for older adults: How does it work?', Psychotherapy, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 459-463.
Floyd, Mark ; Scogin, Forrest. / Cognitive-behavior therapy for older adults : How does it work?. In: Psychotherapy. 1998 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 459-463.
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