Cognitive therapy for depression: A comparison of individual psychotherapy and bibliotherapy for depressed older adults

Mark Floyd, Forrest Scogin, Nancy L. McKendree-Smith, Donna L. Floyd, Paul D. Rokke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thirty-one community-residing older adults age 60 or over either received 16 sessions of individual cognitive psychotherapy (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979) or read Feeling Good (Burns. 1980) for bibliotherapy. Posttreatment comparisons with the delayed-treatment control indicated that both treatments were superior to a delayed-treatment control. Individual psychotherapy was superior to bibliotherapy at posttreatment on self-reported depression, but there were no differences on clinician-rated depression. Further, bibliotherapy participants continued to improve after posttreatment, and there were no differences between treatments at 3-month follow-up. Results suggest that bibliotherapy and that individual psychotherapy are both viable treatment options for depression in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-318
Number of pages22
JournalBehavior Modification
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004

Keywords

  • Bibliotherapy
  • Cognitive therapy
  • Depression
  • Older adults
  • Psychotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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