Cohort Differences in Neurobehavioral Symptoms in Chronic Mild to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

Shannon B. Juengst, Andrew Nabasny, Lauren Terhorst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Our understanding of neurobehavioral symptoms after traumatic brain injury (TBI) largely relies on data gathered in studies conducted at academic medical centers or large clinical centers with research infrastructure. Though this often provides a well-characterized clinical sample, it may also introduce bias based on geographic locations served by these institutions and personal factors associated with patient access to these institutions. We collected neurobehavioral symptoms via the self-reported Behavioral Assessment Screening Tool (BAST) in a National TBI Cohort (n = 263) and a Medical Center TBI Cohort (n = 218) of English-speaking community-dwelling adults with chronic TBI. The primary focus of the present study was to compare demographics and neurobehavioral symptom reporting across the two cohorts and to discuss the implications of any such differences on interpretation of symptom scores. Across all BAST subscales (Negative Affect, Fatigue, Executive Function, Impulsivity, and Substance Abuse), participants in the National TBI Cohort reported significantly more frequent symptoms than those in the Medical Center TBI Cohort (p's < 0.001). Participants in the National TBI Cohort were more likely to be non-White and Hispanic compared to the Medical Center TBI Cohort, and those with mild TBI in the National TBI Cohort were more likely to have less than a high school education than those with mild TBI in the Medical Center TBI Cohort. Individuals with TBI recruited through academic and clinical institutions may not be representative of individuals with TBI living across the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1342
JournalFrontiers in Neurology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 9 2020

Keywords

  • behavior
  • education
  • emotion
  • health disparities
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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