Communication and information sharing at VA facilities during the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza pandemic

Sara M. Locatelli, Sherri L. Lavela, Timothy P. Hogan, Amy N. Kerr, Frances M. Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Effective communication is critical to formulating responses to emergent events in health care settings. However, the range of factors that influenced communication in health care settings during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has received limited attention. Methods: Cross-sectional semistructured interviews were conducted by telephone with 33 infection control key informants at nationally dispersed Veterans Affairs health care facilities. Interviews were guided by an interview script that addressed topics on infection control practices, including information sources, methods of dissemination, barriers and facilitators to effective communication, and recommendations for future practices. Results: Communication was facilitated when information was timely, organized, disseminated through multiple channels, and included educational materials. Barriers to effective communication included feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information received, encountering contradictory information, and restrictions on information dissemination because of uncertainty and inconsistent information. Participants offered recommendations for future pandemics, including the need for standardized educational content, clearer guidance from national organizations, and predefined communication plans for hospital staff. Conclusion: The findings of the present study provide insight about improving communication efforts within Veterans Affairs health care facilities during emergent events. The communication experiences discussed - and barriers and facilitators identified - can also be used in planning for future pandemics and other emergent situations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-626
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume40
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Information Dissemination
Pandemics
Human Influenza
Communication
Veterans Health
Delivery of Health Care
Health Facilities
Interviews
Infection Control
Telephone
Uncertainty
Emotions

Keywords

  • H1N1
  • Infection prevention
  • Influenza
  • Pandemic preparedness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Communication and information sharing at VA facilities during the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. / Locatelli, Sara M.; Lavela, Sherri L.; Hogan, Timothy P.; Kerr, Amy N.; Weaver, Frances M.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 40, No. 7, 01.09.2012, p. 622-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Locatelli, Sara M. ; Lavela, Sherri L. ; Hogan, Timothy P. ; Kerr, Amy N. ; Weaver, Frances M. / Communication and information sharing at VA facilities during the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza pandemic. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2012 ; Vol. 40, No. 7. pp. 622-626.
@article{add3be57460046c2a43dde84216a505e,
title = "Communication and information sharing at VA facilities during the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza pandemic",
abstract = "Background: Effective communication is critical to formulating responses to emergent events in health care settings. However, the range of factors that influenced communication in health care settings during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has received limited attention. Methods: Cross-sectional semistructured interviews were conducted by telephone with 33 infection control key informants at nationally dispersed Veterans Affairs health care facilities. Interviews were guided by an interview script that addressed topics on infection control practices, including information sources, methods of dissemination, barriers and facilitators to effective communication, and recommendations for future practices. Results: Communication was facilitated when information was timely, organized, disseminated through multiple channels, and included educational materials. Barriers to effective communication included feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information received, encountering contradictory information, and restrictions on information dissemination because of uncertainty and inconsistent information. Participants offered recommendations for future pandemics, including the need for standardized educational content, clearer guidance from national organizations, and predefined communication plans for hospital staff. Conclusion: The findings of the present study provide insight about improving communication efforts within Veterans Affairs health care facilities during emergent events. The communication experiences discussed - and barriers and facilitators identified - can also be used in planning for future pandemics and other emergent situations.",
keywords = "H1N1, Infection prevention, Influenza, Pandemic preparedness",
author = "Locatelli, {Sara M.} and Lavela, {Sherri L.} and Hogan, {Timothy P.} and Kerr, {Amy N.} and Weaver, {Frances M.}",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajic.2012.01.035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "622--626",
journal = "American Journal of Infection Control",
issn = "0196-6553",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Communication and information sharing at VA facilities during the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza pandemic

AU - Locatelli, Sara M.

AU - Lavela, Sherri L.

AU - Hogan, Timothy P.

AU - Kerr, Amy N.

AU - Weaver, Frances M.

PY - 2012/9/1

Y1 - 2012/9/1

N2 - Background: Effective communication is critical to formulating responses to emergent events in health care settings. However, the range of factors that influenced communication in health care settings during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has received limited attention. Methods: Cross-sectional semistructured interviews were conducted by telephone with 33 infection control key informants at nationally dispersed Veterans Affairs health care facilities. Interviews were guided by an interview script that addressed topics on infection control practices, including information sources, methods of dissemination, barriers and facilitators to effective communication, and recommendations for future practices. Results: Communication was facilitated when information was timely, organized, disseminated through multiple channels, and included educational materials. Barriers to effective communication included feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information received, encountering contradictory information, and restrictions on information dissemination because of uncertainty and inconsistent information. Participants offered recommendations for future pandemics, including the need for standardized educational content, clearer guidance from national organizations, and predefined communication plans for hospital staff. Conclusion: The findings of the present study provide insight about improving communication efforts within Veterans Affairs health care facilities during emergent events. The communication experiences discussed - and barriers and facilitators identified - can also be used in planning for future pandemics and other emergent situations.

AB - Background: Effective communication is critical to formulating responses to emergent events in health care settings. However, the range of factors that influenced communication in health care settings during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic has received limited attention. Methods: Cross-sectional semistructured interviews were conducted by telephone with 33 infection control key informants at nationally dispersed Veterans Affairs health care facilities. Interviews were guided by an interview script that addressed topics on infection control practices, including information sources, methods of dissemination, barriers and facilitators to effective communication, and recommendations for future practices. Results: Communication was facilitated when information was timely, organized, disseminated through multiple channels, and included educational materials. Barriers to effective communication included feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information received, encountering contradictory information, and restrictions on information dissemination because of uncertainty and inconsistent information. Participants offered recommendations for future pandemics, including the need for standardized educational content, clearer guidance from national organizations, and predefined communication plans for hospital staff. Conclusion: The findings of the present study provide insight about improving communication efforts within Veterans Affairs health care facilities during emergent events. The communication experiences discussed - and barriers and facilitators identified - can also be used in planning for future pandemics and other emergent situations.

KW - H1N1

KW - Infection prevention

KW - Influenza

KW - Pandemic preparedness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865705629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865705629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajic.2012.01.035

DO - 10.1016/j.ajic.2012.01.035

M3 - Article

C2 - 22732657

AN - SCOPUS:84865705629

VL - 40

SP - 622

EP - 626

JO - American Journal of Infection Control

JF - American Journal of Infection Control

SN - 0196-6553

IS - 7

ER -