Community action research track: Community-based participatory research and service-learning experiences for medical students

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and service-learning are unique experiential approaches designed to train medical students how to provide individualized patient care from a population perspective. Medical schools in the US are required to provide support for service-learning and community projects. Despite this requirement, few medical schools offer structured service-learning. We developed the Community Action Research Track (CART) to integrate population medicine, health promotion/disease prevention and the social determinants of health into the medical school curriculum through CBPR and service-learning experiences. This article provides an overview of CART and reports the program impact based on students’ participation, preliminary evaluations and accomplishments. CART is an optional 4‑year service-learning experience for medical students interested in community health. The curriculum includes a coordinated longitudinal program of electives, community service-learning and lecture-based instruction. From 2009–2015, 146 CART students participated. Interests in public health (93%), community service (73%), primary care (73%), CBPR (60%) and community medicine (60%) were the top reasons for enrolment. Significant improvements in mean knowledge were found when measuring the principles of CBPR, levels of prevention, determining health literacy and patient communication strategies (all p’s < 0.05). Most students (73%) were satisfied with CART. Projects were disseminated by at least 65 posters and four oral presentations at local, national and international professional meetings. Six manuscripts were published in peer-reviewed journals. CART is an innovative curriculum for training future physicians to be community-responsive physicians. CART can be replicated by other medical schools interested in offering a longitudinal CBPR and service-learning track in an urban metropolitan setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-143
Number of pages5
JournalPerspectives on Medical Education
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Services Research
Medical Students
action research
medical student
Learning
Medical Schools
learning
community
experience
Curriculum
Social Welfare
Students
Social Determinants of Health
Community Medicine
Physicians
Health Literacy
Problem-Based Learning
Manuscripts
Community Participation

Keywords

  • Community-based participatory research
  • Curriculum
  • Family medicine
  • Medical education
  • Medical school
  • Postgraduate
  • Service-learning
  • Underserved

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Community action research track: Community-based participatory research and service-learning experiences for medical students",
abstract = "Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and service-learning are unique experiential approaches designed to train medical students how to provide individualized patient care from a population perspective. Medical schools in the US are required to provide support for service-learning and community projects. Despite this requirement, few medical schools offer structured service-learning. We developed the Community Action Research Track (CART) to integrate population medicine, health promotion/disease prevention and the social determinants of health into the medical school curriculum through CBPR and service-learning experiences. This article provides an overview of CART and reports the program impact based on students’ participation, preliminary evaluations and accomplishments. CART is an optional 4‑year service-learning experience for medical students interested in community health. The curriculum includes a coordinated longitudinal program of electives, community service-learning and lecture-based instruction. From 2009–2015, 146 CART students participated. Interests in public health (93{\%}), community service (73{\%}), primary care (73{\%}), CBPR (60{\%}) and community medicine (60{\%}) were the top reasons for enrolment. Significant improvements in mean knowledge were found when measuring the principles of CBPR, levels of prevention, determining health literacy and patient communication strategies (all p’s < 0.05). Most students (73{\%}) were satisfied with CART. Projects were disseminated by at least 65 posters and four oral presentations at local, national and international professional meetings. Six manuscripts were published in peer-reviewed journals. CART is an innovative curriculum for training future physicians to be community-responsive physicians. CART can be replicated by other medical schools interested in offering a longitudinal CBPR and service-learning track in an urban metropolitan setting.",
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